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Does deciding between red or white make you blue?

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Once upon a time, you drank white wine with white meats and red wine with meats. Simple, right?

Well, now chic sommeliers will tell you that the old ways are, well, old. Mixing whites with a steak is just fine, if you get the right grapes involved.

In his new book, “The Complete Robuchon,” Joel Robuchon begs to differ. He writes that if you’re serving roast lamb or beef, a hearty red is still the correct choice. He says whites are always a good choice for fish and most poultry dishes. Robuchon, considered one of the world’s greatest chefs if not THE greatest, believes in finding a common flavor between the wine and the food and attempting tie them together. He also says if you’re serving an important bottle, serve it with something simple and vice-versa. Sound advice.
At my house, there’s a lot of heat coming out of the kitchen. I have a tendency to Mexify my meals with fresh serrano chiles or dried chiles de arbol. A lot of people think the only wine worth serving with tacos al carbon comes in a longneck bottle but of the 12-ounce variety. True, you can’t go wrong with a Pacifico or Bohemia, but don’t be afraid to chill a bottle of Sauvignon Blanc, preferably from New Zealand’s Marlborough region. Cakebread Cellars also offers an excellent Blanc, but now you’re getting near the $30 mark for a bottle of wine. These wines aren’t as dry as chardonnays and offer a hint of sweetness, without going over to Riesling country, and cut through the spiciness.

If you want to bring a bottle of wine to a dinner party, try finding out what your host is serving then consult with your local wine shop’s steward. Otherwise, don’t be afraid to grab a dessert wine. Rombauer makes a port that will change your life.

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