NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

Rescue Rundown: OK Humane receives large grant

Advertisement

This two month old puppy is looking for a name and a home. He will leave Oklahoma on Friday headed to Minneapolis, part of OK Humane's relocation program.
This two month old puppy is looking for a name and a home. He will leave Oklahoma on Friday headed to Minneapolis, part of OK Humane's relocation program.

Fewer animals might be facing euthanasia thanks to a large grant from the WaterShed Animal Fund to the Central Oklahoma Humane Society.

OK Humane announced the special grant of $329,000 designed to create new programs and improve existing programs. OK Humane and the WaterShed Animal Fund estimate the percent of animals leaving the Oklahoma City Animal Welfare shelter alive will increase from 74 percent to 80 percent.

Abby Wolfe explained more about the grant during her weekly Rescue Rundown appearance in The Oklahoman's video studio. She said the grant would allow OK Humane to go back into their Relocation program.

"Essentially, relocation saves lives by delivering dogs to other states because our shelters are full. These animals are needed in other areas of the U.S. and are often adopted very quickly," said Wolfe. "For example, Oklahoma has a bunch of cattle dogs. People in Colorado can’t get enough of cattle dogs and many of their shelters aren’t completely full like ours."

Here's more:

  • Homeward Bound Relocation Program- This program will allow OK Humane to transport adult dogs and puppies at risk of euthanasia to shelters in Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, and Colorado that have resources to find them homes. An estimated 70 percent of the animals for this program will come from Oklahoma City Animal Welfare shelter with approximately 30 percent being transferred from rural areas of the state where animal control resources are severely limited. A total of 1,800 dogs will be relocated per year when the program is at full capacity.
  • Bottle Baby Nursery- A nursery supporting an additional 2,000 fragile and nursing puppies and kittens per year will be launched this year. The nursery will allow orphaned puppies and kittens under eight weeks of age to have special care around the clock until they are ready for adoption. The bottle babies in the program will come directly from Oklahoma City Animal Welfare.
  • Foster holding space- Without foster commitments, organizations like OK Humane find it nearly impossible to save animals from local shelters. OK Humane will add additional foster holding space allowing more time to find appropriate fosters.

The WaterShed Animal Fund is a private family foundation that invests in innovative programs with exemplary institutions and individuals to better the lives of companion animals.

“The WaterShed Animal Fund is pleased to support the important work of the Central Oklahoma Humane Society as they continue their partnership with the City of Oklahoma City to save the lives of companion animals in our community,” said WaterShed Animal Fund President Christy Counts.

Related Photos
This two month old puppy is looking for a name and a home. He will leave Oklahoma on Friday headed to Minneapolis, part of OK Humane's relocation program.

This two month old puppy is looking for a name and a home. He will leave Oklahoma on Friday headed to Minneapolis, part of OK Humane's relocation program.

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-547b294dd6bb1de0984d964d996051a9.jpg" alt="Photo - This two month old puppy is looking for a name and a home. He will leave Oklahoma on Friday headed to Minneapolis, part of OK Humane's relocation program." title="This two month old puppy is looking for a name and a home. He will leave Oklahoma on Friday headed to Minneapolis, part of OK Humane's relocation program."><figcaption>This two month old puppy is looking for a name and a home. He will leave Oklahoma on Friday headed to Minneapolis, part of OK Humane's relocation program.</figcaption></figure>
David Morris

Dave Morris serves as Director of Video at OPUBCO, where he's worked since 1996. Morris spent two years as a sports reporter for The Oklahoman before transitioning to online efforts. He has 15 years of digital management with Oklahoman.com and... Read more ›

Comments