NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

We can’t stop getting stuck in things while playing Pokemon Go

Advertisement
People use their phones during a "Pokemon Go" smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)
People use their phones during a "Pokemon Go" smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)

For as long as humans have used technology for good, we’ve also been shoving forks in electrical outlets, driving under the influence of horse tranquilizers, drinking coffee that was made in a Keurig, tweeting nudes when we meant to direct message them, and, well, doing whatever exactly this is.

And now the latest in schadenfreude is upon us: We can’t stop getting stuck in things while playing Pokemon Go.

Is it our own fault for not paying our surroundings adequate attention when we play Pokemon Go? To be sure. Is it Niantic’s fault for developing such a popular cultural touchstone into the addictive, mobile augmented-reality game of its time? Certainly. Is it the fault of public officials and security personnel for having the gall to believe that their actual-reality laws, borders, guidelines and “No trespassing signs” trump my God-given right to go catch that Magmar waddling around a Superfund site? Most assuredly.

And so, as with hoverboards before it, the rapid development of technology has once again bent human behavior toward slight misfortune, as people around the planet just can't keep themselves from getting stuck in things while playing Pokemon Go. Let’s take a look at where, how and why people are getting stuck, perhaps that we might understand our own humanity a little more. And, also, perhaps, that we might snicker at them.

Stuck at the U.S. border with Canada

From an Associated Press report earlier this month:

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — U.S. Border Patrol officials say two Canadian teenagers were briefly apprehended after they accidentally crossed the U.S. border into Montana while playing the game "Pokemon Go."

Border Patrol Agent John South says the teens were engrossed and wandered into the United States.

South says agents detained them while contacting their mother, who was nearby on the Canadian side.

As far as international incidents go this is pretty minor. But still, being so focused on your game that you wander into another country is an impressive level of focus and dedication. Wouldn’t be surprised if these two Canadian teens have found Mewtwo by now.

Michael Young, dressed as Pokemon character Ash Ketchum, plays "Pokemon Go, " in Springfield, Mo. on Friday, July 15, 2016. (Guillermo Hernandez Martinez/The Springfield News-Leader via AP)
Michael Young, dressed as Pokemon character Ash Ketchum, plays "Pokemon Go, " in Springfield, Mo. on Friday, July 15, 2016. (Guillermo Hernandez Martinez/The Springfield News-Leader via AP)

Stuck in a mud pit

Again, from the AP:

COEYMANS, N.Y. (AP) — Authorities say a 62-year-old man playing "Pokemon Go" at night in the woods behind his New York home became stuck in waist-deep mud and had to be rescued.

Police say the man was playing the game on his cellphone at around 2 a.m. Sunday when he wandered into thick woods behind his home in Coeymans, just south of Albany.

Officials say he became trapped in a mud pit up to his waist and couldn't get out. He used his phone to call 911 emergency dispatchers, who guided an officer to his location by pinging the man's phone and the officer's.

First off: Walking around Myriad Gardens on breaks from work (yes, to play Pokemon Go), I’ve encountered not just lots of people playing, but lots of different kinds of people playing, and very rarely alone. Black folks, white folks, old, young, whole families, packs of skateboarders, young couples, old couples, etc. It’s definitely not just younger people playing Pokemon Go.

Second: I like this “stuck” story because the instrument of our 62-year-old’s downfall —his phone— also hails his rescue. Honestly, “The phone you play Pokemon on and also call the cops to come get you un-stuck from playing Pokemon” should probably at this point replace “double-edged sword” as the idiom. Who uses swords anymore?

Anthony Acosta wears a Pikachu hat as he plays Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman
Anthony Acosta wears a Pikachu hat as he plays Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

Stuck in the OU football stadium

You might have heard about this one already. I’d like to highlight one particular passage from this story:

"I'll do a lot of things for a Squirtle — a lot of things I'm not proud of," Zoeller said. "Someone said that they spotted it inside the stadium, specifically inside of the stadium bathroom."

The stranger's promise of a spotted Pokémon in a poorly lit bathroom was enough to convince Zoeller to venture forth.

I believe it was a little somebody named Gandhi who said that the truth never damages a cause that is just.

Tim C., who did not want to give his last name, searches for Pokemon during a gathering of "Pokemon Go" players Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Francisco.(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Tim C., who did not want to give his last name, searches for Pokemon during a gathering of "Pokemon Go" players Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Francisco.(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Stuck in a tree in a New Jersey cemetery

From NBC10 in Philadelphia:

The woman, who police described as a young adult, climbed a tree inside Eglington Cemetery to catch a Pokemon. When she couldn't get down, she called 911 and reluctantly admitted when rescuers talked to her that she'd been playing the game. "She was a bit embarrassed at that point," said Rob Gould III, the township's fire chief.

So far all these people having their names withheld by police out of embarrassment makes me respect OU stadium guy all the more just for being identified. Steven Zoeller’s a real one.

Furthermore, why did she climb that tree? Pokemon Go doesn’t measure depth or height within the game, just your location on an (essentially) two-dimensional plane. Going up or down in real space—as far as I’ve figured out playing this thing for a month— doesn’t offer any advantage to catching Pokemon. Maybe she lied about playing Pokemon Go to cover for something weirder. Moving on.

Stuck in a foreign military base

Once, again, from AP:

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesian police say they detained a Frenchman who trespassed on a military base while playing the augmented reality game "Pokemon Go."

A spokesman for West Java police said that Romain Pierre, 27, was caught at a checkpoint on Monday evening after initially running away when challenged by security guards at the military complex in Cirebon.

Pierre was released a few hours later because it became apparent "he unintentionally entered the complex as he was hunting Pokemon while jogging," the police spokesman, Col. Yusri Yunus, said Tuesday.

Definitely some security concerns there, but I mean, c’mon, Mr. Indonesian General Guy, if you’re keeping a bunch of Scythers back behind those fences, you gotta expect people are gonna try to come catch ‘em.

Stuck in the real pokey. That’s right, we’re talkin’ prison.

From The Detroit News:

A Milford man learned the hard way that it’s important to know where you are when playing “Pokemon Go” after he was arrested Thursday when he accidentally biked to a police station while there was a warrant out for his arrest.

Milford police said the 26-year-old man, who was still in pajama pants, rode up to the station about 10:30 a.m. because it’s the site of a “gym” in the game where players can use their virtual “pocket monsters” to battle other game creatures.

According to Milford Chief of Police Tom Lindberg, a couple of police officers recognized him because they’ve had contact with him.

And here’s a choice paragraph from the bottom of the story:

He said that he forgot that he had a warrant out for his arrest,” Lindberg said. “Like I said, we don’t catch the smart ones.

Forgot you’ve got a warrant out for Pokemon > Forgot about international borders for Pokemon. Sorry, Canadian teens, Milford man went and outdid you.

People use their phones during a "Pokemon Go" smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)
People use their phones during a "Pokemon Go" smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)

Stuck outside of the Toledo Zoo … forever

Again, from AP:

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — A man and woman accused of climbing over a fence at the Toledo Zoo to play "Pokemon Go" have pleaded not guilty to trespassing charges.

The pair was in court Friday to face misdemeanor criminal trespassing charge.

Alright, we have our first case of actual criminal Pokemon hunting. Let’s keep this tape rolling:

Police say 25-year old Robin Bartholomy and 26-year-old Adrian Crawford, both of Toledo, went over a fence at the zoo early Thursday in search of the smartphone game's cartoon monsters.

Bartholomy told Toledo area media outlets she knew it wasn't a very responsible thing to do, but added that she was on the hunt for the monsters.

Crawford said they were having a great time until the police showed up. Both say they were in the zoo about an hour before being spotted on a security camera.

In other words, NO REGRETS, BRO.

We’ve got some hardened, unrepentant criminals on our hands here. Wonder what happened to them.

They're now banned from the zoo.

The moral arc of the universe is long and it bends toward ju— ah, screw it, don’t go breaking into zoos. That’s just disrespectful to penguins.

Stuck in the hospital because YOU WALKED OFF A CLIFF

From the Los Angeles Times:

On Wednesday, firefighters rescued two men who fell several stories off the crumbling sandstone bluff in Encinitas, according to authorities. The men, who were in their early 20s, were playing “Pokemon Go” at the time and likely were led to the cliff when they were trying to catch characters, said Sgt. Rich Eaton of the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department.

One man fell 75 to 100 feet. As firefighters rescued the man, they found the second man unconscious 50 feet down the bluff, said Battalion Chief Robbie Ford of the Encinitas Fire Department. Both were taken to area trauma centers and suffered moderate injuries, he said.

The men, according to firefighters, had crossed a fenced area to get to the bluff.

My walking off cliffs-policy is kinda one of those “Under no circumstances” things and definitely will not bend for Pokemon. Last one:

FILE - In this July 22, 2016 file photo, Japanese students play "Pokemon Go" in the street as its released in Tokyo.(AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)
FILE - In this July 22, 2016 file photo, Japanese students play "Pokemon Go" in the street as its released in Tokyo.(AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)

Stuck in a cave 100 feet underground

Nightmare time. CNN reports that four teenage boys in England were rescued from a cave when:

... they "miraculously" found a phone signal.

There it is, again. Lesson learned. If you’re gonna risk playing Pokemon Go, always keep your phone nearby.

Related Photos
People use their phones during a "Pokemon Go" smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)

People use their phones during a "Pokemon Go" smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-4842364db39f6c49cb683e6fda902dfe.jpg" alt="Photo - People use their phones during a &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)" title="People use their phones during a &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)"><figcaption>People use their phones during a &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-009a142682394dc06f27780fbfa4cefd.jpg" alt="Photo - People use their phones during a &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)" title="People use their phones during a &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)"><figcaption>People use their phones during a &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; smartphone game release party in Toronto, Monday, July 18, 2016. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press via AP)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-cffe3080499040aafaff319983553a21.jpg" alt="Photo - Michael Young, dressed as Pokemon character Ash Ketchum, plays "Pokemon Go, " in Springfield, Mo. on Friday, July 15, 2016. (Guillermo Hernandez Martinez/The Springfield News-Leader via AP)" title="Michael Young, dressed as Pokemon character Ash Ketchum, plays "Pokemon Go, " in Springfield, Mo. on Friday, July 15, 2016. (Guillermo Hernandez Martinez/The Springfield News-Leader via AP)"><figcaption>Michael Young, dressed as Pokemon character Ash Ketchum, plays "Pokemon Go, " in Springfield, Mo. on Friday, July 15, 2016. (Guillermo Hernandez Martinez/The Springfield News-Leader via AP)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-e3c8dcc22da20c3d8d7b23b2a06cef7a.jpg" alt="Photo - FILE - In this July 22, 2016 file photo, Japanese students play "Pokemon Go" in the street as its released in Tokyo.(AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)" title="FILE - In this July 22, 2016 file photo, Japanese students play "Pokemon Go" in the street as its released in Tokyo.(AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)"><figcaption>FILE - In this July 22, 2016 file photo, Japanese students play "Pokemon Go" in the street as its released in Tokyo.(AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-04de60134bd06264bb2875059cb8ca3d.jpg" alt="Photo - &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; players walk along Market Street Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)" title="&quot;Pokemon Go&quot; players walk along Market Street Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)"><figcaption>&quot;Pokemon Go&quot; players walk along Market Street Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-6ad3eac48b627e2baf2705039150b671.jpg" alt="Photo - Tim C., who did not want to give his last name, searches for Pokemon during a gathering of &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; players Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Francisco.(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)" title="Tim C., who did not want to give his last name, searches for Pokemon during a gathering of &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; players Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Francisco.(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)"><figcaption>Tim C., who did not want to give his last name, searches for Pokemon during a gathering of &quot;Pokemon Go&quot; players Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in San Francisco.(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-42813fe1940666993fa56ea523872702.jpg" alt="Photo - People get their photos taken with a Pikachu mascot during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="People get their photos taken with a Pikachu mascot during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>People get their photos taken with a Pikachu mascot during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-4daf8ba2c0afa9f4bf912051a02107b6.jpg" alt="Photo - File: Michael Cross aims his phone at Jane Stevens as they play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City. [Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman archives]" title="File: Michael Cross aims his phone at Jane Stevens as they play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City. [Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman archives]"><figcaption>File: Michael Cross aims his phone at Jane Stevens as they play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City. [Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman archives]</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-cf313cf4ea8d587a25fa3ab485f9a6e6.jpg" alt="Photo - Devon Green, left, and Jane Stevens, 7 1/2, play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="Devon Green, left, and Jane Stevens, 7 1/2, play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Devon Green, left, and Jane Stevens, 7 1/2, play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-f253e9368da4b029cef89535420c7310.jpg" alt="Photo - Michael Cross and his son Aidyn Cross, 10, of Oklahoma City play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="Michael Cross and his son Aidyn Cross, 10, of Oklahoma City play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Michael Cross and his son Aidyn Cross, 10, of Oklahoma City play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-c326fbaee91597c274e9c1b38299c0d2.jpg" alt="Photo - Pokemon Go players cross Reno Ave. during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="Pokemon Go players cross Reno Ave. during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Pokemon Go players cross Reno Ave. during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-09cb3790637a94c7ac38f77abd4ab16a.jpg" alt="Photo - People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-89b1f478210bb351b2a4e124a9bfd317.jpg" alt="Photo - From left, John and Carissa Eads of Mustang, with Cynthia Buckley of Edmond play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="From left, John and Carissa Eads of Mustang, with Cynthia Buckley of Edmond play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>From left, John and Carissa Eads of Mustang, with Cynthia Buckley of Edmond play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-b3e5c76c95727188f6732b2a1804ad2b.jpg" alt="Photo - Jane Stevens, 7 1/2, plays Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="Jane Stevens, 7 1/2, plays Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Jane Stevens, 7 1/2, plays Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-06b243b08e76c614578423672de9360c.jpg" alt="Photo - People play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="People play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>People play Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-23f152c0e42ac8e94ddf0db7ae1a2c68.jpg" alt="Photo - Clint Buckley of Edmond plays Pokemon Go with John and Carissa Eads of Mustang along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="Clint Buckley of Edmond plays Pokemon Go with John and Carissa Eads of Mustang along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Clint Buckley of Edmond plays Pokemon Go with John and Carissa Eads of Mustang along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5efdda67e37137eaaa6cb833152b212b.jpg" alt="Photo - People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-34d5f445d53f916033d229a679062e75.jpg" alt="Photo - People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-aaa59f23f5f43d3d71f1913e9bf75c53.jpg" alt="Photo - John and Carissa Eads of Mustang play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="John and Carissa Eads of Mustang play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>John and Carissa Eads of Mustang play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-ee238f27555e5dab755dd16788c7180f.jpg" alt="Photo - People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-84de6a46e1b7bc6188ad2af919c06818.jpg" alt="Photo - Apple Davies, left, stands next to Cody Morris and his children Zoey Morris, 6, bottom left, and Seyhan Morris, 8, during a meetup for Pokemon Go players in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="Apple Davies, left, stands next to Cody Morris and his children Zoey Morris, 6, bottom left, and Seyhan Morris, 8, during a meetup for Pokemon Go players in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Apple Davies, left, stands next to Cody Morris and his children Zoey Morris, 6, bottom left, and Seyhan Morris, 8, during a meetup for Pokemon Go players in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-b29cd543d05b832311fe866826743f63.jpg" alt="Photo - People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-70f634faf9c2358585a9551d59ebd109.jpg" alt="Photo - Anthony Acosta wears a Pikachu hat as he plays Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="Anthony Acosta wears a Pikachu hat as he plays Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Anthony Acosta wears a Pikachu hat as he plays Pokemon Go during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-62602605f9415cd84fdbfe6d5b80075f.jpg" alt="Photo - John Eads of Mustang plays Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="John Eads of Mustang plays Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>John Eads of Mustang plays Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-9dfa92f51f9ad83ccef34d906061a445.jpg" alt="Photo - People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>People play Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-c4777419c701cc7fa0c36d79b725392c.jpg" alt="Photo - Clint Buckley of Edmond plays Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="Clint Buckley of Edmond plays Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Clint Buckley of Edmond plays Pokemon Go along the Bricktown Canal during a meetup for players of the game in Oklahoma City at Bricktown on Friday, July 29, 2016. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Matt Carney

Matt Carney is the night editor of NewsOK.com and a 2011 graduate of the University of Oklahoma Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication. He was born in Tulsa, lives in Oklahoma City and misses QuikTrip every day. Read more ›

Comments