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The Morning Brew: Undocumented Oklahomans ponder future under new president

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Today is Tuesday. Scan a few headlines making the rounds.

Undocumented Oklahomans ponder future under new president

While President-elect Donald Trump took Oklahoma in a landslide, not everyone is celebrating.

Others are fearful of the impact a Trump presidency will have on their lives and the lives of their loved ones. 

The Oklahoman's Ben Felder reported that Oklahoma City's emerging Hispanic community is largely made up of United States citizens. Thirty seven percent of the city's roughly 125,000 Hispanic residents are foreign-born, according to Pew Research.

Felder interviewed several college students who were brought to Oklahoma at a young age from foreign countries and are now unsure what the future holds.

Hispanic students Rosalinda Espinosa, left, Heily Maldonado, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Samanta Delarosa attend a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016.  Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Hispanic students Rosalinda Espinosa, left, Heily Maldonado, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Samanta Delarosa attend a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

Trump had launched his campaign on a promise to deport millions of undocumented residents and is now two months away from becoming president. The anxieties and fears of many Hispanic families in the community have reached an apex as they wait for policy details to emerge from the president-elect ...

Along with a general concern over what an increase in deportation efforts might look like under a Trump administration, undocumented young adults are worried about the removal of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an executive order under President Barack Obama that has offered a path to employment and college for students who were brought to the United States at a young age.

Even the designation of being born outside the country does not necessarily mean a person is not a U.S. citizen or unauthorized to be in the country.

Hispanic students Heily Maldonado, left, Alejandro Raigoza Munoz, Samanta Delarosa, Maribel Hernandez, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Rosalinda Espinosa discuss the DACA program and its possible status under a Trump administration, during a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016.  Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Hispanic students Heily Maldonado, left, Alejandro Raigoza Munoz, Samanta Delarosa, Maribel Hernandez, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Rosalinda Espinosa discuss the DACA program and its possible status under a Trump administration, during a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

But there are thousands in the community who lack proper documentation as Oklahoma City has grown as a destination for many from Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and other Latin American countries seeking a better life.

“We get to work and go to school in the United States legally, which is something our parents can't do,” said Samanta De La Rosa, an undocumented resident from Oklahoma City now attending OU. “We are out of the shadows, but our fear is we will have to go back into the shadows.”

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Related Photos
Hispanic students Rosalinda Espinosa, left, Heily Maldonado, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Samanta Delarosa attend a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016.  Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

Hispanic students Rosalinda Espinosa, left, Heily Maldonado, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Samanta Delarosa attend a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-3263abe45153b6e476a6844aae57762c.jpg" alt="Photo - Hispanic students Rosalinda Espinosa, left, Heily Maldonado, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Samanta Delarosa attend a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman" title="Hispanic students Rosalinda Espinosa, left, Heily Maldonado, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Samanta Delarosa attend a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Hispanic students Rosalinda Espinosa, left, Heily Maldonado, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Samanta Delarosa attend a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-a472698fdcd246fe48488f46ef0cfe26.jpg" alt="Photo - Hispanic students Heily Maldonado, left, Alejandro Raigoza Munoz, Samanta Delarosa, Maribel Hernandez, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Rosalinda Espinosa discuss the DACA program and its possible status under a Trump administration, during a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman" title="Hispanic students Heily Maldonado, left, Alejandro Raigoza Munoz, Samanta Delarosa, Maribel Hernandez, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Rosalinda Espinosa discuss the DACA program and its possible status under a Trump administration, during a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Hispanic students Heily Maldonado, left, Alejandro Raigoza Munoz, Samanta Delarosa, Maribel Hernandez, Carlos Rubio Regalado, Vanessa Meraz, and Rosalinda Espinosa discuss the DACA program and its possible status under a Trump administration, during a conference at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. Friday, Nov. 18, 2016. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Juliana Keeping

Juliana Keeping is on the enterprise reporting team for The Oklahoman and NewsOK.com. Keeping joined the staff of The Oklahoman in 2012. Prior to that time, she worked in the Chicago media at the SouthtownStar, winning a Peter Lisagor Award... Read more ›

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