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The Morning Brew: Did Russia meddle in the U.S. election?

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Tuesday has arrived. Brace for news.

Did Russia meddle in the U.S. election? 

The CIA concluded Russia interfered in the U.S. presidential election to help Donald Trump win.

The National Security Agency agrees — though evidence is, naturally, cloaked in a veil of secrecy.

The FBI, on the other hand, disagreed with the CIA's assertion, saying there isn't enough evidence.

And President-elect Donald Trump dismissed the Russian hacking talk as mumbo jumbo.

In other words, it's just another day in U.S. politics. 

What's going on? 

While it depends on who you ask, here are a few things we know, and a few things we don't, about cyber mischief before and during election 2016.

#icymi

Read more Morning Brew

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100,000 dead, 30,000 missing: Mexico's war on drugs turns 10

Passerby pause to look at posters showing some victims of the Mexican drug war, on the 10th anniversary of its start, at the Monument  for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Passerby pause to look at posters showing some victims of the Mexican drug war, on the 10th anniversary of its start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

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UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA / COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Sooner defensive end Jimbo Elrod (54) pursues Michigan fullback Rob Lytle (41) during Thursday night action in Miami. The Sooners beat the Michigan Wolverines 14-6 in the Orange Bowl classic on 1/1/76. Staff photo via AP taken by Jim Argo on 1/1/76.  File:  Football/OU/OU-Michigan/Orange Bowl/Jimbo Elrod/1976

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA / COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Sooner defensive end Jimbo Elrod (54) pursues Michigan fullback Rob Lytle (41) during Thursday night action in Miami. The Sooners beat the Michigan Wolverines 14-6 in the Orange Bowl classic on 1/1/76. Staff photo via AP taken by Jim Argo on 1/1/76....

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-n_388046d788faf7b1f3e1ca44daba018d.jpg" alt="Photo - UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA / COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Sooner defensive end Jimbo Elrod (54) pursues Michigan fullback Rob Lytle (41) during Thursday night action in Miami. The Sooners beat the Michigan Wolverines 14-6 in the Orange Bowl classic on 1/1/76. Staff photo via AP taken by Jim Argo on 1/1/76. File: Football/OU/OU-Michigan/Orange Bowl/Jimbo Elrod/1976" title="UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA / COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Sooner defensive end Jimbo Elrod (54) pursues Michigan fullback Rob Lytle (41) during Thursday night action in Miami. The Sooners beat the Michigan Wolverines 14-6 in the Orange Bowl classic on 1/1/76. Staff photo via AP taken by Jim Argo on 1/1/76. File: Football/OU/OU-Michigan/Orange Bowl/Jimbo Elrod/1976"><figcaption>UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA / COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Sooner defensive end Jimbo Elrod (54) pursues Michigan fullback Rob Lytle (41) during Thursday night action in Miami. The Sooners beat the Michigan Wolverines 14-6 in the Orange Bowl classic on 1/1/76. Staff photo via AP taken by Jim Argo on 1/1/76. File: Football/OU/OU-Michigan/Orange Bowl/Jimbo Elrod/1976</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-8e6d29333f63fa663efc534e155f45f0.jpg" alt="Photo - People paint outlines of bodies as part of a memorial for those killed, on the 10th anniversary of the drug war's start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)" title="People paint outlines of bodies as part of a memorial for those killed, on the 10th anniversary of the drug war's start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)"><figcaption>People paint outlines of bodies as part of a memorial for those killed, on the 10th anniversary of the drug war's start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-ed52885820ef2527043c00a7ff6e25c1.jpg" alt="Photo - A woman paints the name of a victim of the Mexican drug war onto a body outline as part of a memorial for those killed, on the 10th anniversary of the drug war's start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)" title="A woman paints the name of a victim of the Mexican drug war onto a body outline as part of a memorial for those killed, on the 10th anniversary of the drug war's start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)"><figcaption>A woman paints the name of a victim of the Mexican drug war onto a body outline as part of a memorial for those killed, on the 10th anniversary of the drug war's start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-a9c0377b2b31ac1f0b2a493513b13abd.jpg" alt="Photo - A boy pauses to look at the painted outline of a body representing a victim of the Mexican drug war, on the 10th anniversary of its start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)" title="A boy pauses to look at the painted outline of a body representing a victim of the Mexican drug war, on the 10th anniversary of its start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)"><figcaption>A boy pauses to look at the painted outline of a body representing a victim of the Mexican drug war, on the 10th anniversary of its start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-119a8b73df50d93621443b7d55083823.jpg" alt="Photo - Passerby pause to look at posters showing some victims of the Mexican drug war, on the 10th anniversary of its start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)" title="Passerby pause to look at posters showing some victims of the Mexican drug war, on the 10th anniversary of its start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)"><figcaption>Passerby pause to look at posters showing some victims of the Mexican drug war, on the 10th anniversary of its start, at the Monument for the the Mexican Revolution, in Mexico City, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin &quot;El Chapo&quot; Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation's roughest regions.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)</figcaption></figure>
Juliana Keeping

Juliana Keeping is on the enterprise reporting team for The Oklahoman and NewsOK.com. Keeping joined the staff of The Oklahoman in 2012. Prior to that time, she worked in the Chicago media at the SouthtownStar, winning a Peter Lisagor Award... Read more ›

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