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The Morning Brew: Gunman assassinates Russian ambassador to Turkey

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Russian Ambassador to Turkey Assassinated

Russia and Turkey have said they will work together in investigating the killing of Russia's ambassador to Turkey. A Turkish policeman fatally shot Ambassador Andrei Karlov on Monday at an art opening in Ankara, shouting: "Don't forget Aleppo! Don't forget Syria!"

The shooter was identified as Mevlut Mert Altintas, a 22-year-old member of Ankara's riot police squad, according to the AP. He was later killed in a shootout with police.

Investigators were working to determine whether the shooting was the work of a lone gunman or part of a wider conspiracy, according to the Associated Press.

The AP reports:

On Tuesday, the foreign ministers of Russia and Turkey attended a previously scheduled meeting in Moscow, where they said they were committed to advancing peace efforts in Syria.

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said Turkey and Russia would work together to determine who was behind the "heinous terror attack" against Karlov, who was killed in front of a stunned audience while making remarks at a photo exhibition in Ankara.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov was hosting Cavusoglu as well as the foreign minister of Iran for a meeting to discuss the Syrian crisis. Top Turkish, Russian and Iranian defense officials were also meeting. Russia and Iran have backed the government of Bashar Assad, while Turkey has supported rebels fighting Assad.

An Associated Press photographer who was attending the event and witnessed the shooting captured harrowing images, including a photo of the gunman standing over the Russian ambassador's body with the gun in one hand and the index finger of his other hand pointed toward the sky. Read the photographer's account of what happened.

North carolina's "bathroom bill" may be repealed

North Carolina lawmakers could be poised to repeal the state's so-called "bathroom bill," a controversial law that limits legal protections for people who are gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender. 

Passage of the measure, which requires people in publicly-owned buildings to use the bathroom that corresponds with the gender on their birth certificate, caused significant backlash, prompting boycotts and costing the state millions in lost jobs, the Charlotte Observer reported.

Outgoing Republican Gov. Pat McCrory announced this week that he would call state legislators back to the Capitol on Wednesday to consider repealing the law.

The Charlotte Observer reports:

Following a surprise move by Charlotte City Council on Monday, Republican Gov. Pat McCrory has called for a special session Wednesday to consider repeal of House Bill 2.

The governor’s statement came in a series of rapidly unfolding events that could signal an end to the nine-month drama that has catapulted North Carolina into national headlines. HB2, seen by critics as an anti-LGBT measure, prompted boycotts and cost the state millions in lost jobs.

Monday’s events also underscored the continuing tensions between Republican lawmakers and Democratic Gov.-elect Roy Cooper.

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Fort Sill soldiers head home for the holidays

Soldiers pass their time with a game of cards Monday as they and other soldiers from Fort Sill gather at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City on their way home for Christmas. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]
Soldiers pass their time with a game of cards Monday as they and other soldiers from Fort Sill gather at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City on their way home for Christmas. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]

Pvt. Claudia Frausto, of Beaverton, Ore., sends text messages while waiting for her flight Monday morning at Will Rogers World Airport. Frausto was one of more than 3,000 soldiers based at Fort Sill who left the post this week on holiday leave. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]
Pvt. Claudia Frausto, of Beaverton, Ore., sends text messages while waiting for her flight Monday morning at Will Rogers World Airport. Frausto was one of more than 3,000 soldiers based at Fort Sill who left the post this week on holiday leave. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]

Running wild: Oklahoma lacks exotic animal laws

A Bengal tiger watches guests at Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park in Wynnewood. [Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman]
A Bengal tiger watches guests at Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park in Wynnewood. [Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman]

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Related Photos
A gunman gestures after shooting the Russian ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov, at a photo gallery Monday in Ankara. The Russian ambassador died later Monday. [AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici]

A gunman gestures after shooting the Russian ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov, at a photo gallery Monday in Ankara. The Russian ambassador died later Monday. [AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici]

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-4aa190b7650d3abf2dc5e8f6af0174fd.jpg" alt="Photo - A gunman gestures after shooting the Russian ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov, at a photo gallery Monday in Ankara. The Russian ambassador died later Monday. [AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici]" title="A gunman gestures after shooting the Russian ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov, at a photo gallery Monday in Ankara. The Russian ambassador died later Monday. [AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici]"><figcaption>A gunman gestures after shooting the Russian ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov, at a photo gallery Monday in Ankara. The Russian ambassador died later Monday. [AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici]</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-f51e0621e68fd2e5668387fd40560fa5.jpg" alt="Photo - Pvt. Claudia Frausto, of Beaverton, Ore., sends text messages while waiting for her flight Monday morning at Will Rogers World Airport. Frausto was one of more than 3,000 soldiers based at Fort Sill who left the post this week on holiday leave. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]" title="Pvt. Claudia Frausto, of Beaverton, Ore., sends text messages while waiting for her flight Monday morning at Will Rogers World Airport. Frausto was one of more than 3,000 soldiers based at Fort Sill who left the post this week on holiday leave. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]"><figcaption>Pvt. Claudia Frausto, of Beaverton, Ore., sends text messages while waiting for her flight Monday morning at Will Rogers World Airport. Frausto was one of more than 3,000 soldiers based at Fort Sill who left the post this week on holiday leave. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-015c2004f0ab087b020bd4aca392adc5.jpg" alt="Photo - A Bengal tiger watches guests at Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park in Wynnewood. [Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman]" title="A Bengal tiger watches guests at Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park in Wynnewood. [Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman]"><figcaption>A Bengal tiger watches guests at Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park in Wynnewood. [Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman]</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-42455c78491610d00c873e7eb48a9a09.jpg" alt="Photo - Soldiers pass their time with a game of cards Monday as they and other soldiers from Fort Sill gather at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City on their way home for Christmas. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]" title="Soldiers pass their time with a game of cards Monday as they and other soldiers from Fort Sill gather at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City on their way home for Christmas. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]"><figcaption>Soldiers pass their time with a game of cards Monday as they and other soldiers from Fort Sill gather at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City on their way home for Christmas. [Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman]</figcaption></figure>
Darla Slipke

Darla Slipke is an enterprise reporter for The Oklahoman. She is a native of Bristol, Conn., and a graduate of the University of Kansas. Slipke worked for newspapers in Kansas, Connecticut, North Carolina and Oklahoma, including a previous... Read more ›

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