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The Morning Brew: Trump's immigration order prompts protests, confusion across the country

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Welcome to Monday. Here are a few headlines to start your week.

Trump's immigration order causes confusion, protests

The executive order on immigration that President Donald Trump signed Friday sparked global backlash, spurred protests across the country and prompted legal challenges over the weekend. 

The order suspended all refugee admissions to the United States for 120 days and indefinitely barred Syrian refugees. It also halted travel to the U.S. from seven predominantly Muslim countries — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — for 90 days.

Trump's aides on Sunday reversed course and said that citizens of those countries who hold permanent U.S. residency "green cards" will not be banned from re-entering the U.S., as officials had previously said, the Associated Press reported.

Immigration lawyers rushed to airports around the United States to help people who were detained because of the travel ban.

Saturday night, a federal judge in New York granted an emergency order temporarily barring the U.S. from deporting people from the seven nations subject to the travel ban and said travelers who had been detained had a strong argument that their legal rights had been violated.

Trump defended his executive order, insisting it is not a "Muslim ban," but many protesters around the nation felt otherwise. People gathered at airports across the U.S. to express their opposition to the executive order.

Police officers block demonstrators from marching  on Sunday on the lower roadway during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel from seven Muslim-majority countries, at Los Angeles International Airport. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Police officers block demonstrators from marching on Sunday on the lower roadway during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel from seven Muslim-majority countries, at Los Angeles International Airport. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)

View a gallery of photos here.

Here are stories of travelers who were affected by the travel ban, including a 58-year-old Syrian woman who was traveling to Indiana to care for her cancer-stricken mother.

Photos spread on social media of families waiting for loved ones. Muzen Elnur, the 11-year-old girl pictured in The Dallas Morning News photograph below, waited for her grandmother from Sudan who was detained at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport.

The woman pictured below traveled to the United States from Iran. She is embracing her son-in-law after being detained at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, according to the AP. 

A woman is embraced Sunday by her son-in-law at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The son-in-law said that the woman had traveled from Iran and had been detained after arriving. President Donald Trump's executive order Friday suspended all immigration and visa processes for nationals from a handful of countries with terrorism concerns, including Iran, for 90 days. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A woman is embraced Sunday by her son-in-law at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The son-in-law said that the woman had traveled from Iran and had been detained after arriving. President Donald Trump's executive order Friday suspended all immigration and visa processes for nationals from a handful of countries with terrorism concerns, including Iran, for 90 days. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Countless other stories about people affected by the ban circulated on social media and through news outlets, like this report from the Associated Press:

Nazanin Zinouri had only been in Iran a couple of days for a family visit when she began to hear rumors that citizens of Muslim-majority nations would be banned from returning to the United States.

The U.S. resident of nearly seven years tried to return home immediately but flights were delayed in Tehran by heavy snow. She'd only gotten as far as Dubai when the ban went into effect and authorities refused to let her board a plane to the United States.

She said by phone Sunday she's been spending her time following the news and worrying about her rescue dog, Dexter, her home, her car and her job. She works for a technology firm in South Carolina.

"What's going to happen to my dog? My dog is sick. Is anyone going to adopt him?" she asked. "Am I going to lose my job forever?"

Zinouri, 29, has a master's degree from Northern Illinois University and a Ph.D. from Clemson University.

She had gone to Iran to see her mother, brother and sister.

Representatives from several Oklahoma social justice and civil rights groups were quick to respond to the executive order, expressing their oppositions and concerns. Read their statements here.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Oklahoma City, issued a statement Sunday in which he said that the order was not a ban on Muslims and encouraged the president's staff to "evaluate American policy with an eye on both security and compassion for the refugees fleeing the terrors of war and persecution."

"America can have strong homeland security and uphold our foundational values of religious freedom and refuge for the persecuted," Lankford said in the statement. "These goals are not mutually exclusive."

Oklahoma State University President Burns Hargis and University of Oklahoma President David Boren each issued statements about the order. 

"The order has created confusion as well as anxiety throughout our country and on our campus," Hargis said in the statement. "Many of our faculty, staff and students come from across the globe. International diversity provides perspectives, experiences and opportunities that enrich the classroom experiences at our university and prepare our students to work in a global community."

Boren said international students are "valued members of our university family."

"Bringing international students to study in our country helps build lasting friendships with people all around the world," Boren said in the statement. "Those who study in our country become persuasive and articulate friends of the United States when they return to their home countries. When we reduce the opportunities for young people to come to America to take advantage of the educational opportunities here, we not only harm them, but we also damage the image and inspiration of America around the world."

Midwest city police investigate triple homicide

Police are on the hunt for a man suspected of killing three other men who were found shot to death Saturday night inside a Midwest City home.

Roman Rocha Pugh, 42, is wanted in the slayings, Midwest City Police Chief Brandon Clabes reported.

#ICYMI

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Darla Slipke

Darla Slipke is an enterprise reporter for The Oklahoman. She is a native of Bristol, Conn., and a graduate of the University of Kansas. Slipke worked for newspapers in Kansas, Connecticut, North Carolina and Oklahoma, including a previous... Read more ›

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