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The Morning Brew: License to discriminate?

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It's finally Friday. Read your news round-up.

Oklahoma Senate panel passes "Right of Conscience Act"

A critic called the “Oklahoma Right of Conscience Act,” AKA Senate Bill 197, "the most discriminatory piece of legislation we have seen in the country in a very long time," but the legislation moved forward this week anyway.

The bill authored by Sen. Joseph Silk, R-Broken Bow, seeks to protect those who discriminate regarding "marriage, lifestyle or behavior." 

You can read the full text here.

The bill now heads to the Senate floor for consideration.

Troy Stevenson, executive director of Freedom Oklahoma, told the Tulsa World the bill codifies discrimination, and not just involving religious beliefs.

“I think the bill protects discrimination not just against LGBT Oklahomans,” Stevenson said. “I think the bill codifies discrimination against an untold number of demographics — divorced couples, interracial couples. This bill is the most discriminatory piece of legislation we have seen in the country in a very long time.”

Silk denied the bill is a license to discriminate and said its aim is not to target the LGBTQ community. 

He told the Tulsa World the bill protects “everybody’s right of conscience and prohibits the state from forcing people to violate their conscience when it comes to marriage, lifestyle and behavior.”

#ICYMI

Read more Morning Brew

The weather

Essential oils, potential poison

These are some of the products sold by Whitney Waller, who operates an essential oils business from her home in Edmond, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017.  Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
These are some of the products sold by Whitney Waller, who operates an essential oils business from her home in Edmond, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

Trump administration lifts transgender bathroom guidance

FILE - In this May 17, 2016 file photo, a new sticker is placed on the door at the ceremonial opening of a gender neutral bathroom at Nathan Hale High School in Seattle. A government official says the Trump administration will revoke guidelines that say transgender students should be allowed to use bathrooms and locker rooms matching their chosen gender identity.  (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
FILE - In this May 17, 2016 file photo, a new sticker is placed on the door at the ceremonial opening of a gender neutral bathroom at Nathan Hale High School in Seattle. A government official says the Trump administration will revoke guidelines that say transgender students should be allowed to use bathrooms and locker rooms matching their chosen gender identity. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

Woman with brain tumor detained by ICE can't speak to family, attorney

Bannon offers up Trump agenda in rare public speaking appearance

Insomnia Cookies delivers its treats until 3 a.m.

Fundraiser started to demolish Oklahoma home where family was killed 

Oklahoma Supreme Court: Syrian man allegedly kidnapped after Tulsa church published baptism online can't sue

Westbrook countdown starts at trade deadline

Jameis Winston laments 'poor word choice' in elementary school speech

Astronomers discover seven Earth-sized planets circling same star 

Pence makes surprise visit to vandalized Jewish cemetery

Theo Richmond, of University City, cleans a headstone at the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, Mo., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Vice President Mike Pence and Governor Eric Greitens visited the cemetery after nearly over 150 headstones were toppled during the weekend. Hundreds of people came out to clean up after the repairs. (JB Forbes /St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
Theo Richmond, of University City, cleans a headstone at the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, Mo., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Vice President Mike Pence and Governor Eric Greitens visited the cemetery after nearly over 150 headstones were toppled during the weekend. Hundreds of people came out to clean up after the repairs. (JB Forbes /St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

Iraqi forces storm Mosul airport, military base

A displaced Iraqi mother and her child flee their home due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)
A displaced Iraqi mother and her child flee their home due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)

Last sips

Avant-garde Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama has a new exhibit at Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum. The kaleidoscopic Infinity Mirrors runs through May 14. Can't get to DC? Check it out here.

Related Photos
These are some of the products sold by Whitney Waller, who operates an essential oils business from her home in Edmond, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017.  Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

These are some of the products sold by Whitney Waller, who operates an essential oils business from her home in Edmond, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-82493cf56ebd3feabb1803b3bc26e0ad.jpg" alt="Photo - These are some of the products sold by Whitney Waller, who operates an essential oils business from her home in Edmond, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman " title="These are some of the products sold by Whitney Waller, who operates an essential oils business from her home in Edmond, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>These are some of the products sold by Whitney Waller, who operates an essential oils business from her home in Edmond, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-070d3e2a16ad31931eada0ee17d051ce.jpg" alt="Photo - FILE - In this May 17, 2016 file photo, a new sticker is placed on the door at the ceremonial opening of a gender neutral bathroom at Nathan Hale High School in Seattle. A government official says the Trump administration will revoke guidelines that say transgender students should be allowed to use bathrooms and locker rooms matching their chosen gender identity. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)" title="FILE - In this May 17, 2016 file photo, a new sticker is placed on the door at the ceremonial opening of a gender neutral bathroom at Nathan Hale High School in Seattle. A government official says the Trump administration will revoke guidelines that say transgender students should be allowed to use bathrooms and locker rooms matching their chosen gender identity. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)"><figcaption>FILE - In this May 17, 2016 file photo, a new sticker is placed on the door at the ceremonial opening of a gender neutral bathroom at Nathan Hale High School in Seattle. A government official says the Trump administration will revoke guidelines that say transgender students should be allowed to use bathrooms and locker rooms matching their chosen gender identity. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5ced86bb60f0fcaf3bc9e60134e14554.jpg" alt="Photo - Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens and Vice President Mike Pence view some of the damage done at the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, Mo., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Over 150 headstones had been overturned by vandals. (J.B. Forbes /St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)" title="Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens and Vice President Mike Pence view some of the damage done at the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, Mo., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Over 150 headstones had been overturned by vandals. (J.B. Forbes /St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)"><figcaption>Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens and Vice President Mike Pence view some of the damage done at the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, Mo., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Over 150 headstones had been overturned by vandals. (J.B. Forbes /St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-50987013b9af2c5dbb75c27d4700b8ee.jpg" alt="Photo - Theo Richmond, of University City, cleans a headstone at the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, Mo., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Vice President Mike Pence and Governor Eric Greitens visited the cemetery after nearly over 150 headstones were toppled during the weekend. Hundreds of people came out to clean up after the repairs. (JB Forbes /St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)" title="Theo Richmond, of University City, cleans a headstone at the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, Mo., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Vice President Mike Pence and Governor Eric Greitens visited the cemetery after nearly over 150 headstones were toppled during the weekend. Hundreds of people came out to clean up after the repairs. (JB Forbes /St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)"><figcaption>Theo Richmond, of University City, cleans a headstone at the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, Mo., on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Vice President Mike Pence and Governor Eric Greitens visited the cemetery after nearly over 150 headstones were toppled during the weekend. Hundreds of people came out to clean up after the repairs. (JB Forbes /St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-22675a70e8da0832536beed80d87c22c.jpg" alt="Photo - A displaced Iraqi mother and her child flee their home due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)" title="A displaced Iraqi mother and her child flee their home due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)"><figcaption>A displaced Iraqi mother and her child flee their home due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5769f779ef35b85659bc683a7a0178bf.jpg" alt="Photo - Displaced Iraqis flee their homes due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The Iraqi security forces advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)" title="Displaced Iraqis flee their homes due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The Iraqi security forces advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)"><figcaption>Displaced Iraqis flee their homes due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The Iraqi security forces advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-94d5f6ace99e539aee28e7f9ec5bd307.jpg" alt="Photo - Displaced Iraqis flee their homes due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The Iraqi security forces advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)" title="Displaced Iraqis flee their homes due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The Iraqi security forces advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)"><figcaption>Displaced Iraqis flee their homes due to fighting between Iraqi special forces and Islamic State militants, on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, Thursday, Feb. 2017. The Iraqi security forces advance comes as part of a major assault that started five days earlier to drive Islamic State militants from the western half of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)</figcaption></figure>
Juliana Keeping

Juliana Keeping is on the enterprise reporting team for The Oklahoman and NewsOK.com. Keeping joined the staff of The Oklahoman in 2012. Prior to that time, she worked in the Chicago media at the SouthtownStar, winning a Peter Lisagor Award... Read more ›

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