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The Morning Brew: Will marijuana's cousin make an Oklahoma comeback?

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Tuesday has arrived. How about a look at the headlines?

Hemp bill stokes hope for enthusiasts, concern from detractors

Hemp, reports The Oklahoman's Brianna Bailey, is marijuana's nonintoxicating cousin, and supporters of a bill say allowing production of the fibrous plant would stoke the Oklahoma economy. 

A bill at the Oklahoma Legislature this session authored by Sen. Anastasia Pittman, D-Oklahoma City, would allow hemp farming in Oklahoma for the first time since the early 20th Century.

Detractors worry hemp operations could be used as cover for marijuana grows. 

Hemp plants       ORG XMIT: 0803212011560576
Hemp plants ORG XMIT: 0803212011560576

A trip into The Oklahoman archives showed hemp hats for tots, girls and ladies were all the rage in the early 20th century. 

For $1, a customer in 1914 Oklahoma could enjoy "Panamas, Hemps, Milan Hemps and Milans. They are trimmed in flowers or ribbons or quills or wings. However, such word sketches convey no idea of the styles and becomingness of these hats ... they are wonder values."

The year 1915 brought a hemp "Shortage fear," read one Page 1 Daily Oklahoman headline, with an accompanying article citing conflict in the Mexican state of Yucat√°n hurting imports for hemp from which most "harvest binding twine used in the United States is made." 

The plant has long stirred controversy and confusion.

"Indian hemp case puzzles officers," read a May 4, 1924 article in  The Daily Oklahoman. The newspaper stated that arrests by a federal officer in Hominy of two men for possession of Indian hemp "has raised question as to whether there is a law covering this plant as a narcotic and whether Indian hemp really is a narcotic as generally understood."  

The law enforcement action was thought to be "the first arrest ever made in the state for the possession of Indian hemp." 

Can-tek labs offers a variety of products infused with organically grown, non-GMO hemp extract that is naturally rich in Cannabidiol at their facility in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, 25 2017. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman
Can-tek labs offers a variety of products infused with organically grown, non-GMO hemp extract that is naturally rich in Cannabidiol at their facility in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, 25 2017. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman

#ICYMI

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Last sips: The rebirth of Black Wall Street

Film taken by Tulsa Rev. Harold Mose Anderson between 1948 and 1952 and preserved by the National Museum of American History's Archives Center shows the rebirth of Black Wall Street in the decades after the devastating Tulsa race riot. Read more and view a portion of the film below.

At a time when segregation limited African American housing options and prevented black customers from patronizing businesses that catered to white customers only, it had one of the largest concentrations of black-owned businesses in the country. Black Wall Street was a vibrant African American neighborhood with a thriving middle class and well-established institutions such as schools, churches, and civic associations.

Related Photos
Hemp plants       ORG XMIT: 0803212011560576

Hemp plants ORG XMIT: 0803212011560576

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-c_3b73542936e6a5acb7c058beac31eef2.jpg" alt="Photo - Hemp plants ORG XMIT: 0803212011560576" title="Hemp plants ORG XMIT: 0803212011560576"><figcaption>Hemp plants ORG XMIT: 0803212011560576</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-690427137c25e4043614fc505900eefb.jpg" alt="Photo - Can-tek labs offers a variety of products infused with organically grown, non-GMO hemp extract that is naturally rich in Cannabidiol at their facility in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, 25 2017. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman" title="Can-tek labs offers a variety of products infused with organically grown, non-GMO hemp extract that is naturally rich in Cannabidiol at their facility in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, 25 2017. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Can-tek labs offers a variety of products infused with organically grown, non-GMO hemp extract that is naturally rich in Cannabidiol at their facility in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, 25 2017. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-e41a90b4c323252a9397b9df71ab60e7.jpg" alt="Photo - Can-tek labs CEO Ryan Early holds a bottle of terpenes in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, 25 2017. The company offers a variety of products infused with organically grown, non-GMO hemp extract that is naturally rich in Cannabidiol. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman" title="Can-tek labs CEO Ryan Early holds a bottle of terpenes in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, 25 2017. The company offers a variety of products infused with organically grown, non-GMO hemp extract that is naturally rich in Cannabidiol. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Can-tek labs CEO Ryan Early holds a bottle of terpenes in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, 25 2017. The company offers a variety of products infused with organically grown, non-GMO hemp extract that is naturally rich in Cannabidiol. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Juliana Keeping

Juliana Keeping is on the enterprise reporting team for The Oklahoman and NewsOK.com. Keeping joined the staff of The Oklahoman in 2012. Prior to that time, she worked in the Chicago media at the SouthtownStar, winning a Peter Lisagor Award... Read more ›

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