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The Morning Brew: Charlottesville shrouds Confederate statues

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Charlottesville shrouds confederate statues

City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Wednesday in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va. The move intended to symbolize the city's mourning for Heather Heyer, killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Wednesday in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va. The move intended to symbolize the city's mourning for Heather Heyer, killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Workers in Charlottesville, Va., covered statues of Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson with black tarps Wednesday.

The move was meant to symbolize mourning for Heather Heyer, a 32-year-old woman who was killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. 

The Charlottesville City Council voted unanimously to cover the statues during a chaotic and emotionally-charged meeting earlier this week. During the meeting, irate residents "screamed and cursed at councilors over the city's response" to the rally, according to the Associated Press.

City officials are unable to take down the statues because of a pending legal challenge. The AP reported: 

The white nationalist rally was sparked by the city council's vote earlier this year to take down the Lee statue. That decision is in the midst of a legal challenge, and a judge has issued an injunction preventing the city from removing the Lee statue while the lawsuit plays out.

A state law passed in 1998 forbids local governments from removing, damaging or defacing war monuments, but there is legal ambiguity about whether that applies to statues such as the Lee monument, which was erected before the law was passed.

A hearing in the case is scheduled for Sept. 1.

The recent events in Charlottesville have prompted discussions across the country regarding building names and monuments honoring Confederate leaders and soldiers. Oklahoma is home to at least two dozen Confederate memorials and monuments, The Oklahoman's Ben Felder reported.

Oklahoma City School Board members have discussed the possibility of re-naming schools in the district that were named after Confederate leaders.

A local attorney agreed to pay to remove all signs and symbols associated with Confederate officers if the district decides to move forward with a proposal to do so. Oklahoma City Public Schools Superintendent Aurora Lora has said she would like to engage with the communities that would be impacted to gauge their interest.

The Oklahoman's Tim Willert reported:

A majority of school board members have said they are in favor of renaming any school that is named after a Confederate officer.

According to the school district's website, Jackson, Lee, Stand Watie and Wheeler elementary schools are named after Confederate generals.

Questions have been raised about whether Lee and Wheeler are actually named after prominent local citizens and not Confederate leaders.

Winning Powerball ticket Sold in Massachusetts

A Powerball lottery ticket is printed out of a lottery machine at a convenience store Wednesday in Northbrook, Ill. Lottery officials said the grand prize for Wednesday night's drawing has reached $700 million, the second-largest on record for any U.S. lottery game. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
A Powerball lottery ticket is printed out of a lottery machine at a convenience store Wednesday in Northbrook, Ill. Lottery officials said the grand prize for Wednesday night's drawing has reached $700 million, the second-largest on record for any U.S. lottery game. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

One lucky person from Massachusetts is about to get a whole lot richer. 

A winning ticket for Wednesday's Powerball jackpot was sold in Massachusetts, officials said. The $758.7 million jackpot is the second-largest in U.S. history. 

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Related Photos
City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Wednesday in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va. The move intended to symbolize the city's mourning for Heather Heyer, killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Wednesday in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va. The move intended to symbolize the city's mourning for Heather Heyer, killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-14b65d48f4d9e3a11d787f4d6bce0a03.jpg" alt="Photo - City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Wednesday in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va. The move intended to symbolize the city's mourning for Heather Heyer, killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)" title="City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Wednesday in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va. The move intended to symbolize the city's mourning for Heather Heyer, killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)"><figcaption>City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Wednesday in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va. The move intended to symbolize the city's mourning for Heather Heyer, killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-e165331d8eec9fd89395af04e4c996eb.jpg" alt="Photo - A Powerball lottery ticket is printed out of a lottery machine at a convenience store Wednesday in Northbrook, Ill. Lottery officials said the grand prize for Wednesday night's drawing has reached $700 million, the second-largest on record for any U.S. lottery game. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)" title="A Powerball lottery ticket is printed out of a lottery machine at a convenience store Wednesday in Northbrook, Ill. Lottery officials said the grand prize for Wednesday night's drawing has reached $700 million, the second-largest on record for any U.S. lottery game. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)"><figcaption>A Powerball lottery ticket is printed out of a lottery machine at a convenience store Wednesday in Northbrook, Ill. Lottery officials said the grand prize for Wednesday night's drawing has reached $700 million, the second-largest on record for any U.S. lottery game. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)</figcaption></figure>
Darla Slipke

Darla Slipke is an enterprise reporter for The Oklahoman. She is a native of Bristol, Conn., and a graduate of the University of Kansas. Slipke worked for newspapers in Kansas, Connecticut, North Carolina and Oklahoma, including a previous... Read more ›

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