NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

The Morning Brew: Texas braces for Hurricane Harvey

Advertisement

It's Friday. Here are a few headlines to start your day.

Texas braces for Hurricane harvey

Marie Michel loads a filled water bottled into her shopping cart Thursday inside a Kroger store in Houston in preparation for Hurricane Harvey. The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Harvey will become a major hurricane to hit the middle Texas coastline. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via Associated Press)
Marie Michel loads a filled water bottled into her shopping cart Thursday inside a Kroger store in Houston in preparation for Hurricane Harvey. The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Harvey will become a major hurricane to hit the middle Texas coastline. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via Associated Press)

Harvey intensified to a hurricane Thursday, and forecasters are warning that it could be the strongest hurricane to hit the United States in more than a decade when it makes landfall late Friday or early Saturday.

The National Hurricane Center warned that "devastating" and "life-threatening" flooding is expected near the Texas coast. Forecasters are predicting Harvey will dump 15 to 25 inches of rain over the middle and upper Texas coast through Wednesday, with isolated rainfall amounts as high as 35 inches in some places.

Residents who live along the Texas coast have been filling sandbags, boarding up windows and flocking to grocery stores to pick up water and supplies in preparation for the storm, media outlets reported.

From the Associated Press

Harvey grew quickly Thursday from a tropical depression into a Category 1 hurricane. Fueled by warm Gulf of Mexico waters, it was projected to become a major Category 3 hurricane. The last storm of that category to hit the U.S. was Hurricane Wilma in October 2005 in Florida.

Superstorm Sandy, which pummeled New York and New Jersey in 2012, never had the high winds and had lost tropical status by the time it struck. But it was devastating without formally being called a major hurricane.

"We're forecasting continuing intensification right up until landfall," National Hurricane Center spokesman Dennis Feltgen said.

All seven Texas counties on the coast from Corpus Christi to the western end of Galveston Island have ordered mandatory evacuations of tens of thousands of residents from all low-lying areas. In four of those counties, officials ordered their entire county evacuated and warned those who stayed behind that no one could be guaranteed rescue. Voluntary evacuations have been urged for Corpus Christi itself and for the Bolivar Peninsula, a sand spit near Galveston where many homes were washed away by the storm surge of Hurricane Ike in 2008.

The National Weather Service is predicting that heavy rainfall may cause flooding across parts of Oklahoma and western north Texas on Friday.

DETAILS REVEALED ABOUT Secret HEARING IN Holtzclaw APPEAl

Documents in Daniel Holtzclaw's appeal that were made public Thursday revealed that a secret hearing in June was closed to the public because of a personnel matter.

The Oklahoman's Kyle Schwab reported: 

The hearing, before Oklahoma County District Judge Timothy Henderson, was to "assist the court in determining which materials, if any, were subject to disclosure to appellate defense counsel in this case."

Holtzclaw, a fired Oklahoma City police officer convicted of sex crimes committed on duty and off, is serving a 263-year prison sentence.

At issue was the personnel file for the forensic chemist who testified during Holtzclaw's trial, according to sources and documents. Prosecutors raised the issue of the personnel matter themselves.

The personnel matter involved issues with the chemist's work but not the validity of her results on DNA tests, sources told The Oklahoman. 

Holtzclaw was accused of sexually assaulting 12 black women and one black teenager between December 2013 and June 2014. In December 2015, jurors found him guilty of 18 sexual offenses involving eight victims. 

#ICYMI

Judge tosses Oklahoma liquor stores' challenge to wine in grocery stores

Oklahoma officials say no agreement on tax hike despite earlier rumors

You've still got time to enjoy grown-in-Oklahoma foods

Hardly used three years ago, over 1,400 emergency certified teachers now in use across state

Read more Morning Brew

The weather

Last Sips

 

Mavis Wanczyk's smile says it all.

The first thing the 53-year-old Massachusetts hospital worker wanted to do after winning the Powerball jackpot was sit back and relax, the Associated Press reported. So, Wanczyk called her work to let them know she wouldn't be coming back. 

Her winning ticket was a combination of numbers she picked using family members' birthdays and her lucky number, four, according to the AP.

Wanczyk chose to take a lump sum payment of $480 million, which amounts to $336 million after taxes, lottery officials reported. Her prize was the largest won by a single lottery ticket in U.S. history.

Related Photos
Marie Michel loads a filled water bottled into her shopping cart Thursday inside a Kroger store in Houston in preparation for Hurricane Harvey. The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Harvey will become a major hurricane to hit the middle Texas coastline. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via Associated Press)

Marie Michel loads a filled water bottled into her shopping cart Thursday inside a Kroger store in Houston in preparation for Hurricane Harvey. The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Harvey will become a major hurricane to hit the middle Texas coastline. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston...

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-38314179e0dc2086f9da401b15ca604a.jpg" alt="Photo - Marie Michel loads a filled water bottled into her shopping cart Thursday inside a Kroger store in Houston in preparation for Hurricane Harvey. The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Harvey will become a major hurricane to hit the middle Texas coastline. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via Associated Press)" title="Marie Michel loads a filled water bottled into her shopping cart Thursday inside a Kroger store in Houston in preparation for Hurricane Harvey. The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Harvey will become a major hurricane to hit the middle Texas coastline. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via Associated Press)"><figcaption>Marie Michel loads a filled water bottled into her shopping cart Thursday inside a Kroger store in Houston in preparation for Hurricane Harvey. The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Harvey will become a major hurricane to hit the middle Texas coastline. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via Associated Press)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-0a6fc17ded15548d57e690f0027aae94.jpg" alt="Photo - " title=""><figcaption></figcaption></figure>
Darla Slipke

Darla Slipke is an enterprise reporter for The Oklahoman. She is a native of Bristol, Conn., and a graduate of the University of Kansas. Slipke worked for newspapers in Kansas, Connecticut, North Carolina and Oklahoma, including a previous... Read more ›

Comments