developing: "Max" statue missing from Myriad GardensMayfield stirs OU-Texas rivalry, rips QB EhlingerLive video: Day 18 of Oklahoma opioid trial

NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

The Morning Brew: Armored backpacks for kids?

Advertisement

It's Friday, November 10. On this day in 1775 the Marines were founded. 

Armored backpacks for kids?

Mass shootings are becoming a fact of life in the United States. This year alone there have been more than 300, according to the Mass Shooting Archive, a non-profit that tracks the incidents. Most recently 26 churchgoers were mascaraed in Texas church just weeks after nearly 60 were killed in Las Vegas. 

Things are bad, and one Florida school is being proactive, offering parents a ballistic panel parents can slip inside their child's backpack. 

From CNN:

A Miami private school is offering parents an unusual item for sale: bulletproof panels for their kids' backpacks. 

The Florida Christian School website has a list of items available for purchase. These include winter wear, red school logo T-shirts and ballistic panels

George Gulla, dean of students and head of school security at Florida Christian School, told CNN the bulletproof panels would add "another level of protection" to students of the pre-K through grade 12 school "in the event of an active shooter." 

The development of bullet proof backpacks for kids is actually a natural progression. Turns out there is a whole industry dedicated to developing bullet proof products for the urban environment. Everything from Kevlar sofas to boxer briefs are available. 

The kiddie panels cost $120 and teachers and parents are trained how to best use them. It's unclear how many have been purchased. 

#ICYMI

Santa Fe South students stage walkout 

Alabama GOP senate canidate accused of sex with teens 

Weigh in on Oklahoma's gross production tax quandary 

Russell Westbrook's clothing line to debut 

The weather

Last sips

Related Photos
Ella Kate Starke, 8, and Connor Shellem, 10, check out super hero backpacks at Belle Isle Walmart, Tuesday July 25, 2017. Photo by Doug Hoke, The Oklahoman

Ella Kate Starke, 8, and Connor Shellem, 10, check out super hero backpacks at Belle Isle Walmart, Tuesday July 25, 2017. Photo by Doug Hoke, The Oklahoman

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-1d3098f0eadc42bed16af51855ef213c.jpg" alt="Photo - Ella Kate Starke, 8, and Connor Shellem, 10, check out super hero backpacks at Belle Isle Walmart, Tuesday July 25, 2017. Photo by Doug Hoke, The Oklahoman" title="Ella Kate Starke, 8, and Connor Shellem, 10, check out super hero backpacks at Belle Isle Walmart, Tuesday July 25, 2017. Photo by Doug Hoke, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Ella Kate Starke, 8, and Connor Shellem, 10, check out super hero backpacks at Belle Isle Walmart, Tuesday July 25, 2017. Photo by Doug Hoke, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-1dd3440666fd7452b5b60317bc6a6746.jpg" alt="Photo - Immigrant youth and students at Santa Fe South High School stage a walkout and rally calling on Congress to pass a clean Dream Act on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman" title="Immigrant youth and students at Santa Fe South High School stage a walkout and rally calling on Congress to pass a clean Dream Act on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Immigrant youth and students at Santa Fe South High School stage a walkout and rally calling on Congress to pass a clean Dream Act on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Matt Patterson

Matt Patterson has been with The Oklahoman since 2006. Prior to joining the news staff in 2010, Patterson worked in The Oklahoman's sports department for five years. He previously worked at The Lawton Constitution and The Edmond Sun.... Read more ›

Comments