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The Morning Bell: What's the impact on students?

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Tushka High School student Jerrid Hobbie takes part in a panel discussion as Joy Hofmeister Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction moderates during the Oklahoma State Department of Education's New Skills for Youth Summit on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman
Tushka High School student Jerrid Hobbie takes part in a panel discussion as Joy Hofmeister Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction moderates during the Oklahoma State Department of Education's New Skills for Youth Summit on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman

Good Wednesday morning!

Four-day school weeks and emergency certified teachers have become increasingly common parts of Oklahoma's public school landscape and each are often cited as examples of the crisis the state's education system is undergoing.

For many, logic would seem to be that five-day school weeks are better than four. And a traditionally trained teacher is better than someone who lacks state certification.

But beyond the perception, the reality of how these changes impact students and their academic achievement can be hard to measure.

I wrote this week about the difficulty in determining the impact growing trends like four-day weeks and emergency certified teachers have on student performance. 

More candidates file, including OKC's District 5

Oklahoma City School Board hopeful Nichell Garcia-Braddy filed papers Tuesday and promptly set her sights on the on the District 5 seat occupied by incumbent Ruth Veales.

Garcia, 45, is a single parent with a finance background who served a year as PTA president at Martin Luther King Elementary School in northeast Oklahoma City.

"I feel strongly about taking care of the schools in this cluster," she said. "I don't feel like that's being done right now."

You can read more about this race and other school board candidates here

School employee arrested

A Choctaw-Nicoma Park Public Schools employee has been arrested, accused of downloading and sharing child pornography.

An arrest warrant was issued in Oklahoma County District Court for Forrest N. Freeman III, 49, on complaints of aggravated possession of child pornography, distribution of child pornography and a computer crimes act violation. He was immediately suspended and has since resigned, according to Superintendent Jim McCharen.

Class is a stumping ground for candidates

Related Photos
Tushka High School student Jerrid Hobbie takes part in a panel discussion as Joy Hofmeister Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction moderates during the Oklahoma State Department of Education's New Skills for Youth Summit on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla.  Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman

Tushka High School student Jerrid Hobbie takes part in a panel discussion as Joy Hofmeister Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction moderates during the Oklahoma State Department of Education's New Skills for Youth Summit on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by...

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-effe88557a912b52eca0e7b19afca50b.jpg" alt="Photo - Tushka High School student Jerrid Hobbie takes part in a panel discussion as Joy Hofmeister Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction moderates during the Oklahoma State Department of Education's New Skills for Youth Summit on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman" title="Tushka High School student Jerrid Hobbie takes part in a panel discussion as Joy Hofmeister Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction moderates during the Oklahoma State Department of Education's New Skills for Youth Summit on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Tushka High School student Jerrid Hobbie takes part in a panel discussion as Joy Hofmeister Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction moderates during the Oklahoma State Department of Education's New Skills for Youth Summit on Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Ben Felder

Ben Felder is an investigative reporter for The Oklahoman. A native of Kansas City, Ben has lived in Oklahoma City since 2010 and covered politics, education and local government for the Oklahoma Gazette before joining The Oklahoman in 2016.... Read more ›

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