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The Morning Bell: Calls for elementary board member to step down

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Kirk Humphreys and others at Humphreys' office in 200 block of S. Walker in downtown Oklahoma City. Story to update The Humphreys Fund, a real estate investment fund. Photos taken in their office on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman
Kirk Humphreys and others at Humphreys' office in 200 block of S. Walker in downtown Oklahoma City. Story to update The Humphreys Fund, a real estate investment fund. Photos taken in their office on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

Good Tuesday morning! 

There have been calls for a former mayor to resign or be removed from the board of an Oklahoma City charter school. 

Pressure mounted Monday on former Oklahoma City Mayor Kirk Humphreys to resign as vice chairman of the University of Oklahoma Board of Regents following his appearance on a Sunday morning talk show when he compared homosexuals to pedophiles. 

While much of the focus has been on Humphreys' role on the board of regents – today's regents meeting is expected to be interesting – there have also been calls for him to resign from the board of John Rex charter elementary school, located in downtown OKC. 

Joe Pierce, head of school for John Rex, responded by stating the school is proud to offer a "supportive and inclusive environment for students and families with many different backgrounds, ethnicities and opinions."

"The views expressed by individual board members are their personal opinions," Pierce said in a statement. "We have always and will always welcome students based solely on our attendance boundary zone and four-tiered priority enrollment system."

You can read more about the response to Humphreys' statements here

Edmond parents have concerns about bullying 

Most parents polled by Edmond Public Schools give the 24,000-student district high marks for safety and quality of instruction, but listed bullying as their greatest concern.

Nearly 90 percent of respondents, meanwhile, said they would "improve salaries to recruit and retain the best staff" if they were running Oklahoma's third largest district.

Nearly 4,800 stakeholders answered the 17-question community engagement survey, which Superintendent Bret Towne called the first of its kind in his 19 years with the district.

Read more about the survey here

A look at testing forms headed to parents

Thousands of families are finding out how their students did in last spring’s Oklahoma State Testing Program. Or they will soon.

Individualized state test reports for families are in the process of being mailed out. 

The Oklahoma State Department of Education provided the Tulsa World with a sample copy of the form, which breaks down how a sample eighth-grader — who would now be a ninth-grader — performed on science, math and English language arts exams.

--There's been a lot of coverage recently about how this year's test scores are impossible to compare with last year's, including a story in the Altus Times: Altus Public School parents start receiving students’ reports this week outlining how their children performed on statewide standardized testing called the Oklahoma School Testing Program. But don’t blame Johnny if his test scores appear in a lower level than in previous years. Ditto for Johnny’s teacher.

Star Spencer donation funds instruments 

Star Spencer High School students have received new band instruments after an anonymous donor contributed $5,000 to The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools' Partners in Action program.

Because the donor was a former ConocoPhillips employee, the company matched his contribution through their matching gift program for a total of $10,000 that will be used to fund several Partners in Action projects across the district.

Norman superintendent talks district strengths, challenges

Norman Public Schools Superintendent Nick Migliorino shared what he learned while visiting over 1,000 classrooms this school year during the Norman Chamber of Commerce State of the Schools luncheon last week, reported the Norman Transcript

Migliorino said the changing demographics of the community and increased diversity at NPS is one of the district’s strengths, especially because NPS is focused on embracing that diversity and using different experiences to make the school stronger.

One of Migliorino’s concerns is that the district is not seeing the same growth other districts around Norman have seen over the past few years.

“I have a non-scientific way of looking at what your community is going to look like in five years; look at your schools now,” Migliorino said. “In five years, your community will look like your school does now.”

Students make cards for veterans

For the eighth consecutive year, Christmas cards will be delivered to Oklahoma veterans and hospitalized military personnel. Many of the cards are handmade by Oklahoma school children, reported KSWO

The cards will be delivered before Christmas Day to residents at all seven state veterans’ centers as well as Fort Sill’s Reynolds Army Hospital and the OKC VA Hospital.

Related Photos
Kirk Humphreys and others at Humphreys' office in 200 block of S. Walker in downtown Oklahoma City. Story to update The Humphreys Fund, a real estate investment fund. Photos taken in their office on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015,  Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

Kirk Humphreys and others at Humphreys' office in 200 block of S. Walker in downtown Oklahoma City. Story to update The Humphreys Fund, a real estate investment fund. Photos taken in their office on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-cbae966d30c721f753d509492cb8709e.jpg" alt="Photo - Kirk Humphreys and others at Humphreys' office in 200 block of S. Walker in downtown Oklahoma City. Story to update The Humphreys Fund, a real estate investment fund. Photos taken in their office on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman" title="Kirk Humphreys and others at Humphreys' office in 200 block of S. Walker in downtown Oklahoma City. Story to update The Humphreys Fund, a real estate investment fund. Photos taken in their office on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Kirk Humphreys and others at Humphreys' office in 200 block of S. Walker in downtown Oklahoma City. Story to update The Humphreys Fund, a real estate investment fund. Photos taken in their office on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Ben Felder

Ben Felder is an investigative reporter for The Oklahoman. A native of Kansas City, Ben has lived in Oklahoma City since 2010 and covered politics, education and local government for the Oklahoma Gazette before joining The Oklahoman in 2016.... Read more ›

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