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The Morning Bell: Virtual charters net most midyear funds

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Jessica Huber, 16, a high school junior works on her geometry as she uses her laptop to take part in her virtual class at her home in Bethany, Okla. on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman
Jessica Huber, 16, a high school junior works on her geometry as she uses her laptop to take part in her virtual class at her home in Bethany, Okla. on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman

Good Thursday morning. It's back to school in Oklahoma City, except at Capitol Hill High School, which is closed due to heating issues and water damage. 

However, a food truck will be at the school from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to serve students who drop by the campus.

Virtual charter growth nets most of midyear funding allocation

Eleven charter schools, including all four of the state’s virtual school choices, were among the top 20 in gaining state aid in annual, midyear adjustments just made by the Oklahoma State Department of Education, reports Andrea Eger of the Tulsa World

Eger writes, in making midyear adjustments, state education officials distributed the final remaining 1.44 percent, or $26.4 million, in state aid for the fiscal year ending June 30, across 512 school districts and 28 charter schools.

New schools and existing ones that see the greatest increases in student enrollment typically stand to pick up the most at this juncture.

Tulsa and Oklahoma City Public Schools lost the most state aid dollars — $2.7 million and $2.1 million, respectively — since initial allocations of state aid were released to public schools in July.

You can read more here

Teachers invited to apply for multicultural grant

The Multicultural Education Institute (MEI) Teacher Incentive Grant offers to help teachers defray the expenses of implementing school activities or projects that promote acceptance and cross-cultural understanding, anti-bias, peacemaking, community service or other aspects of multicultural education. Applications are currently being accepted for Spring 2018 in amounts up to $599. Applications must be submitted by Feb. 9, 2018. Grantees will be announced at the 35th Annual MEI at the Nigh University Center on Feb. 23-24. Apply and learn more here

Governor expands duties for Lopez

Governor Mary Fallin announced that Secretary of State Dave Lopez will also serve as secretary of education and workforce development on her Cabinet. Lopez will being his duties immediately but the appointment must be confirmed by the Oklahoma Senate. He succeeds Natalie Shirley who served in the position since January 2015. (KOKH)

Funding issues continue to frustrate in new year

Public school funding and teacher raises continue to be the biggest issues state educators face in the new year, reports the Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise

Several superintendents in the Bartlesville area voiced their frustrations regarding the ongoing inability of Oklahoma’s lawmakers to pass a budget plan to fund a teacher pay raise.

“I’m very concerned about the lack of progress they’ve made,” said Chuck McCauley, superintendent of Bartlesville schools. “It’s frustrating when you hear people talk about how that it’s not a problem, because frankly it is.”

Computer science standards

The state Department of Education announced it has released the first public draft of academic standards for computer science, which means Oklahoma moves closer to joining only nine other states in the nation with computer science standards and only two others with grade-specific expectations.

“Coding is not only a universal language of the future, it is an art. Computer science is quickly becoming a field that affects every other discipline, from heath and medicine to agribusiness and finance,” said state superintendent Joy Hofmeister. “Today’s competitive education must include a foundation in computer science. 

Perry principal suspension upheld

The Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals has sided with the state Board of Education for suspending the teaching certificate of a former Perry principal accused of failing to report molestation accusations.

Humphreys official resigns from OU board

As promised, Kirk Humphreys waited to resign from the University of Oklahoma Board of Regents until after the football team played its last game of the season.

Humphreys, the board's vice chairman, submitted his resignation to Gov. Mary Fallin on Wednesday, effective immediately. However, he has said he plans to remain on the John Rex school board, despite calls from some parents for him to resign over anti gay remarks he made last month. 

That does it for today's Morning Bell. Have a great Thursday!

Related Photos
Jessica Huber, 16, a high school junior works on her geometry as she uses her laptop to take part in her virtual class at her home in Bethany, Okla. on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017.   Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman

Jessica Huber, 16, a high school junior works on her geometry as she uses her laptop to take part in her virtual class at her home in Bethany, Okla. on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-89659084b86920d1d89075c37d39bded.jpg" alt="Photo - Jessica Huber, 16, a high school junior works on her geometry as she uses her laptop to take part in her virtual class at her home in Bethany, Okla. on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman" title="Jessica Huber, 16, a high school junior works on her geometry as she uses her laptop to take part in her virtual class at her home in Bethany, Okla. on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Jessica Huber, 16, a high school junior works on her geometry as she uses her laptop to take part in her virtual class at her home in Bethany, Okla. on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Ben Felder

Ben Felder is an investigative reporter for The Oklahoman. A native of Kansas City, Ben has lived in Oklahoma City since 2010 and covered politics, education and local government for the Oklahoma Gazette before joining The Oklahoman in 2016.... Read more ›

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