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The Morning Bell: Dept of Ed includes pay raises in budget

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Cherokee Nation Community Resource Investigator Shawnna Eubanks, Cherokee Nation Marshal Shannon Buhl and Tribal Councilor E.O. Smith, of Vian, visit with Vian High School senior Morghan Taylor about her new desktop computer. [Provided]
Cherokee Nation Community Resource Investigator Shawnna Eubanks, Cherokee Nation Marshal Shannon Buhl and Tribal Councilor E.O. Smith, of Vian, visit with Vian High School senior Morghan Taylor about her new desktop computer. [Provided]

Good Tuesday morning. The state Department of Education shared the results of a survey yesterday showing pay was a major reason for many teachers who have recently left the state. 

Armed with those survey results, state schools Superintendent Joy Hofmeister announced her department's proposed budget will include $289 million for a statewide $5,000 salary increase.

"Pay alone won't solve the teacher shortage,” Hofmeister said. “But we are not in the ballgame in any way if we are not offering our teachers competitive pay.”

You can read more about the survey here, and look through the results yourself here

The Cherokee Nation Marshal Service recently surprised seven high school students with new desktop computers to use for both high school and college studies.

“I plan to go to the University of Oklahoma and major in forensic science, so this is really important to be able to do my work,” said Morghan Taylor, of Vian High School. “Instead of having to go to the library all the time to use the computers, I’ll have one in my own dorm. I am surprised; I didn’t know I was going to get all of this.”

The Cherokee Nation Marshal Service receives desktop computers each year to present to deserving students who are chosen by their school leaders, according to the nation's communications department. The project is a collaboration between the Marshal Service and Broken Arrow Police Department, which originally started the program. A number of law enforcement agencies, including the tribe’s Marshal Service, now participate.

Student overdose 

Emergency responders transported a Nathan Hale Junior High School student from the school Monday morning to a local hospital after the student reportedly overdosed on unknown pills. The student, reportedly a 12-year-old, was transported from the school, 2177 S. 67th East Ave., to a local hospital in non-emergent condition, EMSA spokeswoman Kelli Bruer said.

Moore student wins geography contest

Fisher Elementary (Moore) fifth-grader Julia Chen won first place in the Oklahoma Alliance for Geographic Education’s postcard contest for Geography Awareness Week. She drew a postcard of the moment that Rosa Parks took a seat in the middle of a Montgomery, Alabama, bus in 1955 and refused to move to the back, reports the Norman Transcript.

“In earlier grades, I learned that Rosa Parks sat in this seat, she didn’t get up and she was arrested,” Chen said about what she learned during the assignment. “While I was drawing this picture, I was searching for pictures of the actual bus she was on, so I could get an idea. I found this link to a newspaper and I found out that Rosa Parks wasn’t usually the rebellious type. She said the reason she sat in the seat was because she was tired of all of the injustice that happened to her every day.”

Hupfeld honored for mentoring work

Stanley Hupfeld, the former president and chief executive officer of Integris Health, received the Oklahoma Mentoring Trailblazer Award for his work as the founder of INTEGRIS Positive Directions Mentoring Program in 1992.

Stanley Hupfeld Academy, a charter school in Oklahoma City, has more than 200 mentors, he said.

"For me, mentoring is one of those elements that makes a school very very positive, and our performance on tests and things like that, I think, is a direct result of the mentoring program," Hupfeld said.

That does it for today's Morning Bell. Got questions, comments or story ideas? Reach out to bfelder@oklahoman.com. 

Have a great Tuesday!


Related Photos
Cherokee Nation Community Resource Investigator Shawnna Eubanks, Cherokee Nation Marshal Shannon Buhl and Tribal Councilor E.O. Smith, of Vian, visit with Vian High School senior Morghan Taylor about her new desktop computer. [Provided]

Cherokee Nation Community Resource Investigator Shawnna Eubanks, Cherokee Nation Marshal Shannon Buhl and Tribal Councilor E.O. Smith, of Vian, visit with Vian High School senior Morghan Taylor about her new desktop computer. [Provided]

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-3e1e15af31d6508eac6642416c08692d.jpg" alt="Photo - Cherokee Nation Community Resource Investigator Shawnna Eubanks, Cherokee Nation Marshal Shannon Buhl and Tribal Councilor E.O. Smith, of Vian, visit with Vian High School senior Morghan Taylor about her new desktop computer. [Provided]" title="Cherokee Nation Community Resource Investigator Shawnna Eubanks, Cherokee Nation Marshal Shannon Buhl and Tribal Councilor E.O. Smith, of Vian, visit with Vian High School senior Morghan Taylor about her new desktop computer. [Provided]"><figcaption>Cherokee Nation Community Resource Investigator Shawnna Eubanks, Cherokee Nation Marshal Shannon Buhl and Tribal Councilor E.O. Smith, of Vian, visit with Vian High School senior Morghan Taylor about her new desktop computer. [Provided]</figcaption></figure>
Ben Felder

Ben Felder is an investigative reporter for The Oklahoman. A native of Kansas City, Ben has lived in Oklahoma City since 2010 and covered politics, education and local government for the Oklahoma Gazette before joining The Oklahoman in 2016.... Read more ›

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