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The Morning Brew: Where OKC ranks among worst cities for allergies and asthma

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Oklahoma City is among the worst cities in america for allergy and asthma sufferers

Pollen sacks developing on a male Red Cedar in NE Okla. City Tuesday, Mar. 7, 2007. BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, The Oklahoman ORG XMIT: KOD
Pollen sacks developing on a male Red Cedar in NE Okla. City Tuesday, Mar. 7, 2007. BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, The Oklahoman ORG XMIT: KOD

Spring has arrived in Oklahoma City and with it plenty of sniffles, sneezes and coughs. And for good reason.

OKC ranks No. 9 nationally in cities that are terrible for asthma and allergy sufferers. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America compiled based on pollen counts, high use of allergy medication both over the counter and prescription, and access to specialized care by allergists. 

Tulsa, just 100 miles away, ranked No. 40. McCallen, Texas earned the No. 1 ranking. 

Spring allergies can cause a lot of misery for millions of people in the United States, so knowing the most challenging places to live with spring allergies can help people in these areas be more aware of what may contribute to their allergy symptoms.

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) released its annual Spring Allergy CapitalsTMreport on Monday, April 23, to identify the 100 most challenging places to live with spring allergies in the U.S.

More than 50 million Americans with seasonal allergies experience runny and congested noses, inflamed sinuses, relentless sneezing and other symptoms associated with springtime allergies.

Tree pollen is the most common allergen during springtime, while mold comes in second for springtime irritants.

The report is a tool to help identify cities where seasonal allergy symptoms can create challenges.

McAllen, Texas, is the most challenging U.S. city to live in with spring allergies based on higher-than-average pollen scores, higher-than-average medicine usage and lower availability of board-certified allergists in the area. 

More here. 

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Pollen sacks developing on a male Red Cedar in NE Okla. City Tuesday, Mar. 7, 2007. BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, The Oklahoman ORG XMIT: KOD

Pollen sacks developing on a male Red Cedar in NE Okla. City Tuesday, Mar. 7, 2007. BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, The Oklahoman ORG XMIT: KOD

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-643b2f171be2c7f5fb02b87c4c96083d.jpg" alt="Photo - Pollen sacks developing on a male Red Cedar in NE Okla. City Tuesday, Mar. 7, 2007. BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, The Oklahoman ORG XMIT: KOD" title="Pollen sacks developing on a male Red Cedar in NE Okla. City Tuesday, Mar. 7, 2007. BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, The Oklahoman ORG XMIT: KOD"><figcaption>Pollen sacks developing on a male Red Cedar in NE Okla. City Tuesday, Mar. 7, 2007. BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, The Oklahoman ORG XMIT: KOD</figcaption></figure>
Matt Patterson

Matt Patterson has been with The Oklahoman since 2006. Prior to joining the news staff in 2010, Patterson worked in The Oklahoman's sports department for five years. He previously worked at The Lawton Constitution and The Edmond Sun.... Read more ›

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