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NCAA announces transfer, football redshirt rule changes

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Think you know all the NCAA transfer and redshirt rules? 

Think again. 

The NCAA announced changes to rules involving transfers and redshirt procedures Wednesday. 

The Division I council adopted a proposal that prevent schools from blocking transfer requests from student-athletes. Under the new rule, student-athletes can transfer to a different school without asking their current school for permission. 


According to the NCAA's release, student-athletes who wish to transfer will notify their current school of their desire to transfer. Then, the school will have two days to put the student's name in a national transfer data base. Once the name is in the database, other coaches can contact that student. 

With the rule change, schools can't prevent specific programs from contacting a transferring student-athlete. If another school tampers with student-athlete, it could be a Level 2 violation. 

“This creates a safe place for student-athletes to have a conversation with their coaches and makes the whole process more transparent,” former Coastal Carolina football player Nicholas Clark said in a release. “This will clean the process up and give more influence and flexibility to the student-athlete.”

The rule will go into effect Oct. 15. 

Additionally, the NCAA adopted a proposal from the Division I Council that will allow football players to play in up to four games without losing a season of competition. 

The rule essentially allows players to retain a redshirt year if they play in four games or less in a season due to injury or other factors. 

“This change promotes not only fairness for college athletes, but also their health and well-being. Redshirt football student-athletes are more likely to remain engaged with the team, and starters will be less likely to feel pressure to play through injuries,” said Miami Athletics Director and council chair Blake James in an NCAA release. “Coaches will appreciate the additional flexibility and ability to give younger players an opportunity to participate in limited competition.”

The rule will go into effect for the 2018-19 season. 

Related Photos
The NCAA headquarters is pictured, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Indianapolis. The Commission on College Basketball led by Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, released a detailed 60-page report Wednesday, seven months after the NCAA formed the group to respond to a federal corruption investigation that rocked college basketball. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

The NCAA headquarters is pictured, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Indianapolis. The Commission on College Basketball led by Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, released a detailed 60-page report Wednesday, seven months after the NCAA formed the group to respond to a federal corruption...

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-45c5b5b6337385000799eb70e6e33f99.jpg" alt="Photo - The NCAA headquarters is pictured, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Indianapolis. The Commission on College Basketball led by Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, released a detailed 60-page report Wednesday, seven months after the NCAA formed the group to respond to a federal corruption investigation that rocked college basketball. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)" title="The NCAA headquarters is pictured, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Indianapolis. The Commission on College Basketball led by Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, released a detailed 60-page report Wednesday, seven months after the NCAA formed the group to respond to a federal corruption investigation that rocked college basketball. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)"><figcaption>The NCAA headquarters is pictured, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Indianapolis. The Commission on College Basketball led by Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, released a detailed 60-page report Wednesday, seven months after the NCAA formed the group to respond to a federal corruption investigation that rocked college basketball. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)</figcaption></figure>
Brooke Pryor

Brooke Pryor comes to The Oklahoman by way of North Carolina where she worked for a handful of organizations primarily covering UNC athletics. She covered UNC as the sports editor of the Daily Tar... Read more ›

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