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Morning Bell: Tulsa looking for new name for Lee School

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After heated meeting, board slows down on 'Lee School' renaming.
After heated meeting, board slows down on 'Lee School' renaming.

Good Friday morning. Tulsa Public Schools is looking to delay the name Lee School from taking effect on July 1 and will work over the summer to develop a new name, reports the Tulsa World.

"Today I learned that at the next Tulsa Board of Education meeting on June 18, the action agenda will include an item that will delay the effective date of the school name change to 'Lee School,'" Principal Aubrey Flowers wrote in a letter to parents Thursday.

The school was renamed Lee School in May after a monthslong process that resulted in the school board rescinding its original name, Robert E. Lee Elementary, which will remain in effect until a new name is made permanent.

Leaders at top-ranked charters resign

The leaders of two highly regarded Oklahoma City charter schools have resigned their positions, reports The Oklahoman's Tim Willert

Harding Charter Preparatory High School Principal Mylo Miller is leaving to become a superintendent in another state while Dove Science Academy Superintendent Umit Alpaslan is stepping down after six years because of health concerns.

U.S. News & World Report recently ranked Harding Charter Prep and Dove Science Academy as the top two high schools in Oklahoma. Three other Oklahoma City district schools were ranked in the state's Top 20.

Sex abuse lawsuit against school to continue 

A federal judge has refused to dismiss a lawsuit alleging officials at an Oklahoma school did nothing to stop sexual attacks against a middle school student, reports KFOR.

The ruling dated Monday allows the lawsuit against Washington Public Schools to go forward. Judge Stephen Friot did, however, remove from the lawsuit school Superintendent A.J. Brewer and Principal Stuart McPherson in their official capacities.

Schools can donate land to Tribal Housing Authority 

Starting Aug. 2, Oklahoma school districts will be allowed to transfer surplus land to tribal housing authorities, reports Public Radio Tulsa.

So far, those transactions could only happen with local governments or a state university.

"There are some school districts that had come to us over the years saying, 'We have surplus land, and the highest and best use of that would be affordable housing in our area,' and this just breaks down a barrier to accomplishing that," said Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr.

Have a great weekend! 

Ben Felder

Ben Felder is an investigative reporter for The Oklahoman. A native of Kansas City, Ben has lived in Oklahoma City since 2010 and covered politics, education and local government for the Oklahoma Gazette before joining The Oklahoman in 2016.... Read more ›

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