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Oklahoma Medicaid plans offer solution for costly prescription drugs

Mary Holloway Richard is a Phillips Murrah attorney.

Mary Holloway Richard is a Phillips Murrah attorney.

State Medicaid plans offer solution for costly Rx drugs

Q: Oklahoma recently has been recognized by Secretary Alex Azar, of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, for innovations in its Medicaid prescription drug program designed to lower drug costs to the state. How was the state able to accomplish this feat?

A: Medicaid is a federal program that's administered by the states. In Oklahoma, it's administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority. So, while the state receives some federal funding, a good portion of Medicaid funds are supplied by the state. In order to reduce costs related to prescription drugs, Oklahoma applied to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and was granted an amendment to the Oklahoma State Plan that facilitates prescription drug cost savings. The plan links the payment of a drug to its effectiveness and outcomes. This is essentially what we refer to as “value-based” prescription drug purchasing. CMS reports that “(t)he state plan amendment proposal submitted by Oklahoma will be the first state plan amendment permitting a state to pursue CMS-authorized supplemental rebate agreements involving value-based purchasing arrangements with drug manufacturers.” This program is part of the Trump administration's “American Patients First” blueprint, designed to address rising drug prices.

Q: How will the amendment work in Oklahoma?

A: The amendment to the state plan, as approved by CMS, now allows Oklahoma to negotiate and enter into valued-based contracts with drug manufacturers. This means that, through identifying the most effective medications, the state can tailor its negotiations with manufacturers to drugs that have demonstrated the most success in treating patients, thereby achieving cost savings and efficiencies in treatment. Negotiating value-based contracts will supplement Oklahoma's ability to control drug prices under its current participation in the Sovereign States Drug Consortium. The Consortium negotiates supplemental rebates on behalf of states. Oklahoma is free to accept or reject rebate offers.

Q: Are there other cost saving initiatives related to decreasing prescription drug costs?

A: Currently, certain drugs have a preferred status if they're listed on the Medicaid State Supplemental Rebate Agreement. Almost every state Medicaid plan, including Oklahoma's, gives the state the authority to negotiate supplemental rebate agreements with drug manufacturers. These agreements allow for rebates to be given to the state by manufacturers as least as large as those provided in the Medicaid national drug rebate agreement. Importantly, two other parts of the Trump administration's plan to decrease drug costs include giving Medicare insurance plans greater ability to negotiate for the Medicare Program (Part B and prescription drugs) and to make drug prices transparent for consumers. The latter part of the president's plan would require drugmakers to disclose list prices in public advertising.

PAULA BURKES, BUSINESS WRITER

Paula Burkes

A 1981 journalism graduate of Oklahoma State University, Paula Burkes has more than 30 years experience writing and editing award-winning material for newspapers and healthcare, educational and... Read more ›

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