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Fallin approves controversial rules on medical marijuana

Gov. Mary Fallin has signed emergency rules regulating Oklahoma's medical marijuana industry a day after they were introduced by the State Board of Health.

Although the industry said more regulations were needed to ensure the new law could be effectively implemented, her decision Wednesday set off a firestorm of commentary about controversial provisions that were introduced shortly before the board's action.

"These rules are the best place to start in developing a proper regulatory framework for medical marijuana, with the highest priority given to the health and safety of Oklahomans," Fallin said. "They are also the quickest and most cost-efficient way to get the process actually started as required by the law passed by the people."

Most of the new rules are typical bureaucratic fare, including sections that regulate labels, testing, advertising and disposal.

However, additions introduced before the meeting Tuesday included provisions that ban smokable marijuana and some edibles, and the requirement that each dispensary hire a pharmacist. Those measures were pushed by the state's health care community, who opposed State Question 788 before more than half a million Oklahomans voted to make it law.

The governor can only approve or deny the entire rule change; she cannot pick and choose which parts of it to sign. Fallin said she expects modifications to the rules but continued to rule out a special legislative session to address comprehensive legislation.

Lawmakers will have a chance to review the rules, but only when they convene in regular session next February.

"I know some citizens are not pleased with these actions," Fallin said. "But I encourage everyone to approach this effort in a constructive fashion in order to honor the will of the citizens of Oklahoma who want a balanced and responsible medical marijuana law."

State Question 788 required the Oklahoma State Department of Health to start the application process by July 26. Completed licensing forms can be turned in on Aug. 25.

The rules could draw legal challenges by the state's burgeoning cannabis industry, or by advocates who have campaigned for years to adopt medical marijuana.

Bud Scott, executive director of New Health Solutions Oklahoma, said after the board's vote Tuesday that it would be financially unfeasible for every dispensary to employ a pharmacist, and that the rules ban products that are widely available in other states with medical marijuana laws.

In a news release on Wednesday, the group's Political Director Jed Green said the rules are designed to hamstring the industry.

"By refusing to show leadership and call a special session, the governor's office has handed over implementation of Oklahoma's medical cannabis program to a group of bureaucrats that are beholden to the special interest groups that fought State Question 788," Green said.

The group, which is one of two cannabis trade organizations based in Oklahoma, did not say whether they would challenge the law.

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<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-4bb5db564e8b42b6f25644d53797aa79.jpg" alt="Photo - " title=""><figcaption></figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-657d6bb87502b2c184bfde436c5a30cc.jpg" alt="Photo - Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-979c4561c30ebd70fd88a29b8ea05c98.jpg" alt="Photo - Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-39844fe0c59b6ed0f7b395525c7404cb.jpg" alt="Photo - A man sits at a voting cubicle to mark his ballot. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="A man sits at a voting cubicle to mark his ballot. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>A man sits at a voting cubicle to mark his ballot. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-20fc3843703c3854e761162117784221.jpg" alt="Photo - Perrin Smith, of Midwest City, leaves no doubt as to whether he voted in the primary election. He placed his &quot;I Voted&quot; sticker on his left cheek, just below his eye. Smith is retired from the US Air Force. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Perrin Smith, of Midwest City, leaves no doubt as to whether he voted in the primary election. He placed his &quot;I Voted&quot; sticker on his left cheek, just below his eye. Smith is retired from the US Air Force. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Perrin Smith, of Midwest City, leaves no doubt as to whether he voted in the primary election. He placed his &quot;I Voted&quot; sticker on his left cheek, just below his eye. Smith is retired from the US Air Force. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-7b1d319d500cd5557311ce2f507f0cf1.jpg" alt="Photo - Lorraine Hill fills out her ballot on election day as she votes at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman " title="Lorraine Hill fills out her ballot on election day as she votes at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Lorraine Hill fills out her ballot on election day as she votes at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-6477c46de91e03bdf22600985df6d8f9.jpg" alt="Photo - Roxie Aragon fills out her ballot on election day to cast her votes at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman " title="Roxie Aragon fills out her ballot on election day to cast her votes at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Roxie Aragon fills out her ballot on election day to cast her votes at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-793a8921dfb170cbf409ea8009c4d6a7.jpg" alt="Photo - Voters fill out their ballots on election day at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman " title="Voters fill out their ballots on election day at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Voters fill out their ballots on election day at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-ecf52e192062908a33ebe1b97f45305a.jpg" alt="Photo - Carol Ice fills out her ballot to cast her votes on election day at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman " title="Carol Ice fills out her ballot to cast her votes on election day at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Carol Ice fills out her ballot to cast her votes on election day at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-c27b8ce5332d28fbb03fa9fac17b81ff.jpg" alt="Photo - Kaylee Heflin, 6, waits for her father Brandon to fill out his ballot on election day at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman " title="Kaylee Heflin, 6, waits for her father Brandon to fill out his ballot on election day at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Kaylee Heflin, 6, waits for her father Brandon to fill out his ballot on election day at International Pentecostal Assembly in Yukon, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-20fc3843703c3854e761162117784221.jpg" alt="Photo - Perrin Smith, of Midwest City, leaves no doubt as to whether he voted in the primary election. He placed his &quot;I Voted&quot; sticker on his left cheek, just below his eye. Smith is retired from the US Air Force. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Perrin Smith, of Midwest City, leaves no doubt as to whether he voted in the primary election. He placed his &quot;I Voted&quot; sticker on his left cheek, just below his eye. Smith is retired from the US Air Force. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Perrin Smith, of Midwest City, leaves no doubt as to whether he voted in the primary election. He placed his &quot;I Voted&quot; sticker on his left cheek, just below his eye. Smith is retired from the US Air Force. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-979c4561c30ebd70fd88a29b8ea05c98.jpg" alt="Photo - Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-9d9660dc663cc952bfc2b6b2a143e1ab.jpg" alt="Photo - Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-461d67e08cf737e0cdc7117cdca1175a.jpg" alt="Photo - Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-45b0007c5b03fe37c2af8bca89ac00c8.jpg" alt="Photo - Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-39844fe0c59b6ed0f7b395525c7404cb.jpg" alt="Photo - A man sits at a voting cubicle to mark his ballot. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="A man sits at a voting cubicle to mark his ballot. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>A man sits at a voting cubicle to mark his ballot. Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-657d6bb87502b2c184bfde436c5a30cc.jpg" alt="Photo - Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Voters in precincts 97 and 98 shared voting booth space inside the Midwest City Community Church of the Nazarene near SE 15 and Post Rd during primary election voting on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. An election worker at the site described voter turnout as &quot;heavy,'&quot; saying that lines of voters waiting to cast their ballots were at least 12-20 deep most of the day, and at times, the line extended out the door and into the parking lot. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-7ed5d77ac6b90acd5530374fa0e2fae2.jpg" alt="Photo - Ron Marlatt and his wife, Liz, toast beverages after early voting results indicated a lead for the approval of SQ 788, the medical marijuana issue. The Marletts, who live in Warr Acres, attended a watch party at the Colcord Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City where a small group of medical marijuana supporters followed election results on television and electronic devices. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Ron Marlatt and his wife, Liz, toast beverages after early voting results indicated a lead for the approval of SQ 788, the medical marijuana issue. The Marletts, who live in Warr Acres, attended a watch party at the Colcord Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City where a small group of medical marijuana supporters followed election results on television and electronic devices. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Ron Marlatt and his wife, Liz, toast beverages after early voting results indicated a lead for the approval of SQ 788, the medical marijuana issue. The Marletts, who live in Warr Acres, attended a watch party at the Colcord Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City where a small group of medical marijuana supporters followed election results on television and electronic devices. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-49aa44a646dc499910c1847e525f86d8.jpg" alt="Photo - Brothers Elijah, 6, and Caleb Grotts, 4, enjoy a game of cornhole while accompanying their parents to a watch party on the patio of the Colcord Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City where a small group of medical marijuana supporters followed election results on television and electronic devices. These boys' mother, Lauren Grotts, was also keeping her attention focused on the House District 101 race, in which she was a candidate. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Brothers Elijah, 6, and Caleb Grotts, 4, enjoy a game of cornhole while accompanying their parents to a watch party on the patio of the Colcord Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City where a small group of medical marijuana supporters followed election results on television and electronic devices. These boys' mother, Lauren Grotts, was also keeping her attention focused on the House District 101 race, in which she was a candidate. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Brothers Elijah, 6, and Caleb Grotts, 4, enjoy a game of cornhole while accompanying their parents to a watch party on the patio of the Colcord Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City where a small group of medical marijuana supporters followed election results on television and electronic devices. These boys' mother, Lauren Grotts, was also keeping her attention focused on the House District 101 race, in which she was a candidate. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5a75cbd1705b7ce2116ab447ab032205.jpg" alt="Photo - Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb speaks to supporters after conceding the Republican primary race for governor at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb speaks to supporters after conceding the Republican primary race for governor at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb speaks to supporters after conceding the Republican primary race for governor at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-13994dede957656106e8c0eefa060fd3.jpg" alt="Photo - Kimberly Thomas smiles and jubilantly dances on the patio with a medical marijuana flag draped around her. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Kimberly Thomas smiles and jubilantly dances on the patio with a medical marijuana flag draped around her. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Kimberly Thomas smiles and jubilantly dances on the patio with a medical marijuana flag draped around her. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-eb13900bf8d2458b924b3e3fe10cf2f9.jpg" alt="Photo - Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb speaks to supporters next to his wife, Monica, as he concedes the Republican primary race for governor at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb speaks to supporters next to his wife, Monica, as he concedes the Republican primary race for governor at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb speaks to supporters next to his wife, Monica, as he concedes the Republican primary race for governor at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-175d675f31c54f45dc3cfcc1d24cb80d.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett speaks with his family behind him at his watch party for Oklahoma Governor inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett speaks with his family behind him at his watch party for Oklahoma Governor inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett speaks with his family behind him at his watch party for Oklahoma Governor inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-94155fca39210edc26485aca36702925.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett speaks with a group of Mick for Governor volunteers at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett speaks with a group of Mick for Governor volunteers at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett speaks with a group of Mick for Governor volunteers at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-da2d6b82b202490ffa7162c141318e1a.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett speaks with a group of Mick for Governor volunteers at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett speaks with a group of Mick for Governor volunteers at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett speaks with a group of Mick for Governor volunteers at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5d404b34856c995da34dc95aa2c57110.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett looks at his wife Terri Cornett while speaking to supporters and volunteers during his watch party inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett looks at his wife Terri Cornett while speaking to supporters and volunteers during his watch party inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett looks at his wife Terri Cornett while speaking to supporters and volunteers during his watch party inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-13e23c8b6e6438bdd0e672ec2fa2296e.jpg" alt="Photo - Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb hugs his daughter, Lauren, next to his son, Griffin, and wife, Monica, during his speech to supporters conceding the Republican primary for governor at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb hugs his daughter, Lauren, next to his son, Griffin, and wife, Monica, during his speech to supporters conceding the Republican primary for governor at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb hugs his daughter, Lauren, next to his son, Griffin, and wife, Monica, during his speech to supporters conceding the Republican primary for governor at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-c034805bb1bbb5c494283403bf4ddcc5.jpg" alt="Photo - Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb gives a concession speech at his election watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Monica and his son Griffin. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman" title="Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb gives a concession speech at his election watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Monica and his son Griffin. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb gives a concession speech at his election watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Monica and his son Griffin. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-256ba5928e6f3fa19a17c49bd5192c7b.jpg" alt="Photo - Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb gives a concession speech at his election watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Monica and his son Griffin. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman" title="Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb gives a concession speech at his election watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Monica and his son Griffin. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb gives a concession speech at his election watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Monica and his son Griffin. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-138627fc0921ec7f25923ea27f0232ef.jpg" alt="Photo - Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb gives his daughter Lauren a hug after thanking her for her role in his campaign videos at his election watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman" title="Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb gives his daughter Lauren a hug after thanking her for her role in his campaign videos at his election watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb gives his daughter Lauren a hug after thanking her for her role in his campaign videos at his election watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-138545d43fb2ade420a48185d95035e9.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett takes a selfie with family and friends at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett takes a selfie with family and friends at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett takes a selfie with family and friends at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-0cadb07472a11cf2f5549444158830de.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett speaks to supporters and volunteers at his watch party inside the Tower Theater after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett speaks to supporters and volunteers at his watch party inside the Tower Theater after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett speaks to supporters and volunteers at his watch party inside the Tower Theater after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-7f81645b29bd799dc52defbd1dd93579.jpg" alt="Photo - Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb hugs Peggy Smalley after speaking to supporters and conceding the Republican primary for governor at his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb hugs Peggy Smalley after speaking to supporters and conceding the Republican primary for governor at his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb hugs Peggy Smalley after speaking to supporters and conceding the Republican primary for governor at his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-0cbb23387668c89d0ca639be6b0ca101.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett speaks to supporters and volunteers at his watch part inside the Tower Theater after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett speaks to supporters and volunteers at his watch part inside the Tower Theater after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett speaks to supporters and volunteers at his watch part inside the Tower Theater after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-8494eae7dc2238f14a1cfdb280be2e4c.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter gives a speech during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Cheryl, right, and his son and daughter-in-law, Barrett and Rachael Hunter. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter gives a speech during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Cheryl, right, and his son and daughter-in-law, Barrett and Rachael Hunter. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter gives a speech during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Cheryl, right, and his son and daughter-in-law, Barrett and Rachael Hunter. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-f58e68ad29f818c245b9227e893efcff.jpg" alt="Photo - Leslie Collum, a registered nurse, is nearly in tears as she savors an apparent victory as election totals are announced. Collum planted signs, waved signs on roadsides and at intersections and worked &quot;so very hard&quot; for the passage of SQ 788. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Leslie Collum, a registered nurse, is nearly in tears as she savors an apparent victory as election totals are announced. Collum planted signs, waved signs on roadsides and at intersections and worked &quot;so very hard&quot; for the passage of SQ 788. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Leslie Collum, a registered nurse, is nearly in tears as she savors an apparent victory as election totals are announced. Collum planted signs, waved signs on roadsides and at intersections and worked &quot;so very hard&quot; for the passage of SQ 788. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-d78e29f4022ac99d50401ca136a4deb3.jpg" alt="Photo - Kimberly Thomas smiles and jubilantly dances on the patio with a medical marijuana flag draped around her. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Kimberly Thomas smiles and jubilantly dances on the patio with a medical marijuana flag draped around her. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Kimberly Thomas smiles and jubilantly dances on the patio with a medical marijuana flag draped around her. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-b81924e581756c4f1f00bf6351748142.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett waves to supporters and volunteers at his watch party after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett waves to supporters and volunteers at his watch party after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett waves to supporters and volunteers at his watch party after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-475dcab5ae944ba09afb5d553477a5bc.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett hugs his wife Terri Cornett after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett hugs his wife Terri Cornett after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett hugs his wife Terri Cornett after winning the Republican primary for Oklahoma Governor inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-fe253a218490223d4e8146d3c1c78ba6.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter gives a speech during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Cheryl, right, and his son and daughter-in-law, Barrett and Rachael Hunter. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter gives a speech during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Cheryl, right, and his son and daughter-in-law, Barrett and Rachael Hunter. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter gives a speech during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. He is accompanied by his wife Cheryl, right, and his son and daughter-in-law, Barrett and Rachael Hunter. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-2cd4c5c4720f23646b457849fe73ea53.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter stands with his daughter-in-law Rachael Hunter as he goes through his notes for a speech at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter stands with his daughter-in-law Rachael Hunter as he goes through his notes for a speech at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter stands with his daughter-in-law Rachael Hunter as he goes through his notes for a speech at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-e392b0962ca37f36c0db412c3e1d4173.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter answers questions during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter answers questions during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter answers questions during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-fe50fad6bb9675a9c28a214a0ce68294.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter prepares for an interview during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter prepares for an interview during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter prepares for an interview during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-045610c252bc6838871bb3717a9bacda.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter prepares for an interview during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter prepares for an interview during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter prepares for an interview during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Anya Magnuson, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-9f5231cb086fa6a87a69eaddaab70f62.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter talks to the media at his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter talks to the media at his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter talks to the media at his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-71524acba4c4b2c0479b3e91a7e7d031.jpg" alt="Photo - Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-4dc0187eb37e5fbce4cf63a57a5d9502.jpg" alt="Photo - A supporter watches democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson speak at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="A supporter watches democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson speak at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>A supporter watches democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson speak at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-b29625fbf890cde438f421244bcb72fa.jpg" alt="Photo - Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-3eb24c8314206f6244b7c05d093b8be7.jpg" alt="Photo - Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-a5e50bab76286da5f95f9a89a1519831.jpg" alt="Photo - Leslie Collum, a registered nurse, shouts and claps as election totals are announced. Collum planted signs, waved signs on roadsides and at intersections and worked &quot;so very hard&quot; for the passage of SQ 788. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Leslie Collum, a registered nurse, shouts and claps as election totals are announced. Collum planted signs, waved signs on roadsides and at intersections and worked &quot;so very hard&quot; for the passage of SQ 788. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Leslie Collum, a registered nurse, shouts and claps as election totals are announced. Collum planted signs, waved signs on roadsides and at intersections and worked &quot;so very hard&quot; for the passage of SQ 788. Several hundred supporters of SQ 788 celebrate the passage of the medical marijuana initiative at a watch party Tuesday night, June 26, 2018, at the Speakeasy, near NW 50 and Western Avenue in Oklahoma City. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-1a7efe557030c33fe18efaf82bf0f631.jpg" alt="Photo - Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, embraces his wife Linda Edmondson after addressing supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, embraces his wife Linda Edmondson after addressing supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, embraces his wife Linda Edmondson after addressing supporters at his primary victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-1e1394de41508dc319da990d90aaee2e.jpg" alt="Photo - Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-8d73942906eaddbf88bba9715c405ce2.jpg" alt="Photo - Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-bc5b38d480b03349cb4d06711539b2f2.jpg" alt="Photo - Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, greets supporters before taking the stage at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, greets supporters before taking the stage at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, greets supporters before taking the stage at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-4ffb5a372bf0de279c5b412a471e3ead.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks to supporters next to his wife, Cheryl, during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks to supporters next to his wife, Cheryl, during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks to supporters next to his wife, Cheryl, during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5b68d202f323682c088b371a57bf42b7.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks next to his wife, Cheryl Hunter, right, son Barrett Hunter, left, and daughter-in-law Rachael Hunter, at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks next to his wife, Cheryl Hunter, right, son Barrett Hunter, left, and daughter-in-law Rachael Hunter, at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks next to his wife, Cheryl Hunter, right, son Barrett Hunter, left, and daughter-in-law Rachael Hunter, at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-3314fb99fa66e3c25881d204575d7220.jpg" alt="Photo - Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks to supporters next to his wife, Cheryl, during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks to supporters next to his wife, Cheryl, during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks to supporters next to his wife, Cheryl, during his watch party at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-63b11e3a572391d651b35c27a60003dc.jpg" alt="Photo - Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, prepares to take the stage at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, prepares to take the stage at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, prepares to take the stage at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-3659b7fcfdb6c9f65c6569b3d45f0c85.jpg" alt="Photo - Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman" title="Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson, addresses supporters at his victory party in Oklahoma City on June 26, 2018. Nick Oxford for The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-03ed6db47a3becc39a36baf8f2234562.jpg" alt="Photo - Mick Cornett speaks with a KOTV 6 reporter at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)" title="Mick Cornett speaks with a KOTV 6 reporter at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)"><figcaption>Mick Cornett speaks with a KOTV 6 reporter at his watch part inside the Tower Theater in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Photo by Alonzo Adams for The Oklahoman)</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-f9adc295629138f9d2344769e6360986.jpg" alt="Photo - People mingle at the watch party for Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb, Republican candidate for governor, at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="People mingle at the watch party for Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb, Republican candidate for governor, at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>People mingle at the watch party for Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb, Republican candidate for governor, at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-18c6d275d662a0eb6354975caccca93c.jpg" alt="Photo - J.C. Watts at the watch party for Attorney General Mike Hunter at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman" title="J.C. Watts at the watch party for Attorney General Mike Hunter at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>J.C. Watts at the watch party for Attorney General Mike Hunter at the Renaissance Waterford Oklahoma City Hotel in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-40c1c188045ba6209689512b08225c2a.jpg" alt="Photo - Ronald Osterhout visits with Becky Payton, board treasurer. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Ronald Osterhout visits with Becky Payton, board treasurer. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Ronald Osterhout visits with Becky Payton, board treasurer. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-50cc600f7153a78ac2e8b2f27636baae.jpg" alt="Photo - Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-1c7b89a8eb08750c3b49a39b1646ec76.jpg" alt="Photo - Timothy Starkey, board president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Timothy Starkey, board president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Timothy Starkey, board president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-d6cf99b686a658dd1d0a35198b6d3748.jpg" alt="Photo - Ronald Osterhout looks at notes in his binder. At left is Dr. R. Murali Krishna. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Ronald Osterhout looks at notes in his binder. At left is Dr. R. Murali Krishna. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Ronald Osterhout looks at notes in his binder. At left is Dr. R. Murali Krishna. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-65cef8ac8e7bc37dd4de632ab7005975.jpg" alt="Photo - Timothy Starkey, board president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Timothy Starkey, board president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Timothy Starkey, board president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-55abf0e21fa15ac772c1f7891a690aaf.jpg" alt="Photo - R. Murali Krishna, board member. Addressing the board is Julie Ezell, general counsel for the health department. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="R. Murali Krishna, board member. Addressing the board is Julie Ezell, general counsel for the health department. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>R. Murali Krishna, board member. Addressing the board is Julie Ezell, general counsel for the health department. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-b43cddcaf77eea3a226beb1a05fb8d47.jpg" alt="Photo - Tom Bates, interim commissioner, Oklahoma Department of Health. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Tom Bates, interim commissioner, Oklahoma Department of Health. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Tom Bates, interim commissioner, Oklahoma Department of Health. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-7fa935d713544c0ed7046766f07d01c5.jpg" alt="Photo - Tom Bates, interim commissioner, Oklahoma Department of Health. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Tom Bates, interim commissioner, Oklahoma Department of Health. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Tom Bates, interim commissioner, Oklahoma Department of Health. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-edbf18fdcf911078f88651c4255ba563.jpg" alt="Photo - Timothy Starkey, board president, right, greets Dr. Charles Grim. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Timothy Starkey, board president, right, greets Dr. Charles Grim. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Timothy Starkey, board president, right, greets Dr. Charles Grim. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-0425bce21d81ac338069ce12420e0195.jpg" alt="Photo - Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-4b1d3ac206a48401bd799d36ea36a4d5.jpg" alt="Photo - Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-fe588716baa43de6ea9789e3a428cc5c.jpg" alt="Photo - R. Murai Krishna, left, and Ronald Osterhout. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="R. Murai Krishna, left, and Ronald Osterhout. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>R. Murai Krishna, left, and Ronald Osterhout. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-329597c1101f8cdfd1403e480b54cd9d.jpg" alt="Photo - Tom Bates, left, and Timothy Starkey. Bates is interim commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Health. Starkey is board president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Tom Bates, left, and Timothy Starkey. Bates is interim commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Health. Starkey is board president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Tom Bates, left, and Timothy Starkey. Bates is interim commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Health. Starkey is board president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5179f141cea5e8353151bfd6cc4c4db3.jpg" alt="Photo - From left, Dr. R. Murali Krishna, Ronald Osterhout and Becky Payton. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="From left, Dr. R. Murali Krishna, Ronald Osterhout and Becky Payton. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>From left, Dr. R. Murali Krishna, Ronald Osterhout and Becky Payton. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-989f634eaad370e4eb1e7463ecfde157.jpg" alt="Photo - Juli Ezell, general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Juli Ezell, general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Juli Ezell, general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-b5081eddb8c6cff76d401858d09e8d6f.jpg" alt="Photo - R. Murali Krishna, board member. Addressing the board is Julie Ezell, general counsel for the health department. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="R. Murali Krishna, board member. Addressing the board is Julie Ezell, general counsel for the health department. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>R. Murali Krishna, board member. Addressing the board is Julie Ezell, general counsel for the health department. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-0753ae5b5fc5f2b472fe38a6674a13c9.jpg" alt="Photo - Julie Ezell distributes copies of proposal to members of the board. From left are Tom Bates. interim chairman for the Oklahoma Department of Health; Timothy Starkey, board president; Dr. Jenny Alexopulos, and Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Julie Ezell distributes copies of proposal to members of the board. From left are Tom Bates. interim chairman for the Oklahoma Department of Health; Timothy Starkey, board president; Dr. Jenny Alexopulos, and Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Julie Ezell distributes copies of proposal to members of the board. From left are Tom Bates. interim chairman for the Oklahoma Department of Health; Timothy Starkey, board president; Dr. Jenny Alexopulos, and Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-c4e75b05659f7eb4bc9cb2185142535d.jpg" alt="Photo - The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-6d5039384f188737d2d5407ba87e0fdc.jpg" alt="Photo - From left, Timothy Starkey, board president; Dr. Jenny Alexopulos, and Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="From left, Timothy Starkey, board president; Dr. Jenny Alexopulos, and Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>From left, Timothy Starkey, board president; Dr. Jenny Alexopulos, and Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-1bca9a4c61df45aaa1086b20b3e39da0.jpg" alt="Photo - The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-dc0452dee6a036f338b10bcaa5f9cd35.jpg" alt="Photo - Juli Ezell, general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Juli Ezell, general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Juli Ezell, general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-9fb968a52c187fd1fbe6a60b46646727.jpg" alt="Photo - Juli Ezell, general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. Seated at left is Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. At Right is Dr. R. Murali Krishna. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Juli Ezell, general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. Seated at left is Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. At Right is Dr. R. Murali Krishna. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Juli Ezell, general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. Seated at left is Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. At Right is Dr. R. Murali Krishna. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-2f6d636d1669cd108f0064099d018111.jpg" alt="Photo - Julie Ezell, former general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman archives" title="Julie Ezell, former general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman archives"><figcaption>Julie Ezell, former general counsel for the health department, explains proposed regulations to board members. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman archives</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-3c0b6e3bdb5e4cb18fd1848e850d3aae.jpg" alt="Photo - From left, Charles E. Skillings, Tom Bates and Timothy Starkey, board president. Bates is interim commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Health. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="From left, Charles E. Skillings, Tom Bates and Timothy Starkey, board president. Bates is interim commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Health. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>From left, Charles E. Skillings, Tom Bates and Timothy Starkey, board president. Bates is interim commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Health. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-3335ecb37b8cbea772d2d1f8c98b4f6c.jpg" alt="Photo - From left are Tom Bates. interim chairman for the Oklahoma Department of Health; Timothy Starkey, board president; Dr. Jenny Alexopulos, and Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="From left are Tom Bates. interim chairman for the Oklahoma Department of Health; Timothy Starkey, board president; Dr. Jenny Alexopulos, and Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>From left are Tom Bates. interim chairman for the Oklahoma Department of Health; Timothy Starkey, board president; Dr. Jenny Alexopulos, and Dr. Edward Legako, board vice-president. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-53319ee2913213bd1facd977403021ed.jpg" alt="Photo - Seated, from left, are Dr. R. Murali Krishna, Ronald Osterhout and Becky Payton, board treasurer. Standing at podium is Julie Ezell, general counsel for the health department. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Seated, from left, are Dr. R. Murali Krishna, Ronald Osterhout and Becky Payton, board treasurer. Standing at podium is Julie Ezell, general counsel for the health department. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Seated, from left, are Dr. R. Murali Krishna, Ronald Osterhout and Becky Payton, board treasurer. Standing at podium is Julie Ezell, general counsel for the health department. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-9916db439fdfe70c596de1384439f6d4.jpg" alt="Photo - One of two rooms set up with a television and audio to allow overflow crowd to watch the meeting. An official with the health department estimated the number of people in both rooms to be around 135. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="One of two rooms set up with a television and audio to allow overflow crowd to watch the meeting. An official with the health department estimated the number of people in both rooms to be around 135. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>One of two rooms set up with a television and audio to allow overflow crowd to watch the meeting. An official with the health department estimated the number of people in both rooms to be around 135. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-d5eaaaf8fd276202a3176c911dd178c9.jpg" alt="Photo - From left are Dr. Charles Grim, Dr. Terry R. Gerard II and Charles E. Skillings. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="From left are Dr. Charles Grim, Dr. Terry R. Gerard II and Charles E. Skillings. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>From left are Dr. Charles Grim, Dr. Terry R. Gerard II and Charles E. Skillings. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-d3c87726e51ac562bf03fc6ab094e170.jpg" alt="Photo - Charles E. Skilings, board member. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Charles E. Skilings, board member. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Charles E. Skilings, board member. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-08d4d84ea87e659d91fda5ae252bf966.jpg" alt="Photo - From left are Tom Bates. interim chairman for the Oklahoma Department of Health; Timothy Starkey, board president and Dr. Jenny Alexopulos. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="From left are Tom Bates. interim chairman for the Oklahoma Department of Health; Timothy Starkey, board president and Dr. Jenny Alexopulos. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>From left are Tom Bates. interim chairman for the Oklahoma Department of Health; Timothy Starkey, board president and Dr. Jenny Alexopulos. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-9d99974685248c88052d91b9d713c197.jpg" alt="Photo - File: People watch as the Oklahoma State Board of Health adopts emergency rules for medical marijuana on Tuesday, July 10. Two controversial amendments, including a ban of sales of smokable marijuana, were added. The changes were met with immediate opposition by supporters and lawmakers alike. [Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman archives]" title="File: People watch as the Oklahoma State Board of Health adopts emergency rules for medical marijuana on Tuesday, July 10. Two controversial amendments, including a ban of sales of smokable marijuana, were added. The changes were met with immediate opposition by supporters and lawmakers alike. [Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman archives]"><figcaption>File: People watch as the Oklahoma State Board of Health adopts emergency rules for medical marijuana on Tuesday, July 10. Two controversial amendments, including a ban of sales of smokable marijuana, were added. The changes were met with immediate opposition by supporters and lawmakers alike. [Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman archives]</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-3e94e1131541593cc5292afee6e7cc22.jpg" alt="Photo - Seated on the floor near the front of the room is Paul Tay. Tay said he is a candidate for the District 9 seat on the Tulsa City Council. While at the meeting, he was seeking signatures for a petition currently circulating to advance SQ 796 and SQ 797. One of two rooms set up with a television and audio to allow overflow crowd to watch the meeting. An official with the health department estimated the number of people in both rooms to be around 135. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Seated on the floor near the front of the room is Paul Tay. Tay said he is a candidate for the District 9 seat on the Tulsa City Council. While at the meeting, he was seeking signatures for a petition currently circulating to advance SQ 796 and SQ 797. One of two rooms set up with a television and audio to allow overflow crowd to watch the meeting. An official with the health department estimated the number of people in both rooms to be around 135. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Seated on the floor near the front of the room is Paul Tay. Tay said he is a candidate for the District 9 seat on the Tulsa City Council. While at the meeting, he was seeking signatures for a petition currently circulating to advance SQ 796 and SQ 797. One of two rooms set up with a television and audio to allow overflow crowd to watch the meeting. An official with the health department estimated the number of people in both rooms to be around 135. The Oklahoma State Department of Health voted at their monthly meeting Tuesday morning, July 10, 2018, to ban sales of smokeable forms of medical marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire a pharmacist. The Board of Health voted on 75 pages of rules creating a rough framework for patients, physicians, caretakers and business owners interested in medical marijuana. The ban on sales of leaves and flowers for smoking and the requirement to hire a pharmacist weren’t in the draft rules presented to the board, but were a priority of a coalition of medical groups. Julie Ezell, the Health Department’s general counsel, presented the rules to a packed board room and to members of the public watching in an overflow room and online. She cautioned board members that the two new rules they added might not be allowed under the state question, inviting a court challenge. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure>
Dale Denwalt

Dale Denwalt has closely followed state policy and politics since his first internship as an Oklahoma Capitol reporter in 2006. He graduated from Northeastern State University in his hometown... Read more ›

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