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Morning Bell: Oklahoma students give advice to new teachers

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Student Katie Weinand, senior, Norman North; speaks at a fourm hosted by Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma's State Superintendent of Public Instruction, during the EngageOK on the Road event at Norman North High School on Thursday, July 12, 2018 in Norman, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman
Student Katie Weinand, senior, Norman North; speaks at a fourm hosted by Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma's State Superintendent of Public Instruction, during the EngageOK on the Road event at Norman North High School on Thursday, July 12, 2018 in Norman, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman

Good Monday morning. State schools Superintendent Joy Hofmeister led a panel discussion at Norman North High School last week with students who took time to share what they wish their teachers knew.

The students, most of them incoming high school seniors, didn't hold back.

"There are going to be bad kids that talk crap on you and just yell at you in class and stuff like that," said Nini Wu, a senior at Norman North. "Don't let that get to you.

"There are so many more kids in that class that want to listen to you, and they want to let you try. Don't let one kid affect the other kids in your class that want to learn."

The panel was part of the state department's EngageOK traveling conference. The Oklahoman's Tim Willert wrote about it here

Yukon High senior Dawson Simeroth warned against first-year teachers trying to please every student.

"If you do that you spread yourself way too thin, you go after something that's completely unattainable and you kind of end up completely undermining your own authority," said Simeroth, the son of Yukon Public Schools Superintendent Jason Simeroth.

Divisions shown on rename of Lee School

The five proposed names for Lee School were on display in the midtown elementary school’s gym Saturday, along with the divisions the naming process has caused, reports the Tulsa World

Parents and alumni milled about, writing down what they thought of the five names — Abraham Lincoln, Clara Luper, Woody Guthrie, Council Oak and Maple Ridge. They then put their feedback in small cardboard boxes for each respective proposed name.

“Keep it Lee!,” Sarah Dougherty wrote across the top of each form she filled out. She wore a Lee School shirt and has been among the advocates for changing the name from Robert E. Lee Elementary to Lee School — the first name change that the school board passed in May.

Food pantry stocking up for back-to-school

Now through Sept. 30, the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma is seeking food donations to stock the shelves of school pantries in preparation for the new school year.

The School Pantry Program provides chronically hungry middle and high school students with food to sustain them after school and over the weekends, reports KFOR news. Last year, 5,770 chronically hungry students attending 167 schools received weekly groceries.

Donations can be dropped off at the Regional Food Bank’s Volunteer Center, located at 3355 S. Purdue in Oklahoma City, Monday through Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to noon and 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.

High school students create heart monitors

At last week's University of Oklahoma’s Engineering Days, high school students were taught the mechanics of heart monitors. The high schoolers were instructed on how to solder circuit boards to create a functioning device, and then tested them out on their own pulses, reports the Norman Transcript

“We took a circuit board and used different routers, and we had to solder one of them onto the circuit board,” Allix Huggan, who will be a senior at Westmoore High School this August, said. “Then when you put your finger on the heart valve, it tells you how much your heart is beating. We calculated how fast our heart was beating in a minute.”

Those devices will now be sent to the Engineering World Health organization, which will then distribute them to countries in Africa, Latin America and Asia for instructional purposes in biomedical engineering programs. 

Free school vaccines in OKC

Oklahoma Caring Vans will offer vaccines needed for school attendance to qualifying kids ages six weeks to 18. The shots are free to children who are uninsured, eligible for Medicaid, or American Indian. They are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. You can find a list of locations here.

That does it for today's Morning Bell. See you tomorrow. 

Related Photos
Student Katie Weinand, senior, Norman North; speaks at a fourm hosted by Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma's State Superintendent of Public Instruction, during the EngageOK on the Road event at Norman North High School on Thursday, July 12, 2018 in Norman, Okla.  Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman

Student Katie Weinand, senior, Norman North; speaks at a fourm hosted by Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma's State Superintendent of Public Instruction, during the EngageOK on the Road event at Norman North High School on Thursday, July 12, 2018 in Norman, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-fb55781483a6d27ca89b724d8d4fec42.jpg" alt="Photo - Student Katie Weinand, senior, Norman North; speaks at a fourm hosted by Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma's State Superintendent of Public Instruction, during the EngageOK on the Road event at Norman North High School on Thursday, July 12, 2018 in Norman, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman" title="Student Katie Weinand, senior, Norman North; speaks at a fourm hosted by Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma's State Superintendent of Public Instruction, during the EngageOK on the Road event at Norman North High School on Thursday, July 12, 2018 in Norman, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Student Katie Weinand, senior, Norman North; speaks at a fourm hosted by Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma's State Superintendent of Public Instruction, during the EngageOK on the Road event at Norman North High School on Thursday, July 12, 2018 in Norman, Okla. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Ben Felder

Ben Felder is an investigative reporter for The Oklahoman. A native of Kansas City, Ben has lived in Oklahoma City since 2010 and covered politics, education and local government for the Oklahoma Gazette before joining The Oklahoman in 2016.... Read more ›

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