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The Morning Brew: How sweaty is OKC?

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Breaking: Oklahoma city is hot!

A boy removes his cap to cool his head beneath one of the water misters at the Oklahoma City Zoo on Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman
A boy removes his cap to cool his head beneath one of the water misters at the Oklahoma City Zoo on Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

Oklahoma City is a hot place to spend a summer any way you slice it. Even on "kinda nice" days like Monday, it was fairly warm. Add the scorchers we had over a three-day period several weeks ago, and it can be downright miserable. 

But it's not all bad. We're not the "sweatiest city in America", at least not when it comes to how one company ranks them. 

Whether you are sitting poolside, taking a stroll or fighting off hot flashes, it can be difficult to stay cool as temperatures climb this summer. Beating the heat doesn't have to be a sweaty struggle though, especially for those of us living in one of this year's newly announced America's Sweatiest Cities. This year marks the fourth annual national ranking conducted by the marketers of Honeywell Fans, and environmental consulting company, Environmental Health & Engineering (EH&E). New criteria were introduced this year including humidity levels, length of summer and access to shade.

Orlando checks in as the nation's sweatiest city. And as someone who has spent more than 20 minutes outside in Orlando this time of year, it's hard to argue that point. Phoenix is No. 3, but it's a dry heat. OK-sizzle is the No. 6 sweatiest city in the country, according to Honeywell's list. Here's the complete top 10: 

1. Orlando, Florida

2. New Orleans, Louisiana

3. Phoenix, Arizona (It's a dry heat)

4. Dallas, Texas

5. Las Vegas, Nevada (Also a dry heat) 

6. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

7. Kansas City, Missouri

8. Austin, Texas (Sometimes it's a humid heat, other times it's dry) 

9. Atlanta, Georgia

10. Memphis, Tennessee

"In preparation for the impending heat and inevitable perspiration, this year we looked at a variety of criteria to see which cities had the longest summer season, the fewest bodies of water, the highest humidity, and the highest temperature days in a row, all contributing to a city's 'sweat factor'," said Dr. Ted Myatt, ScD, who led the study by EH&E. "There were several new factors taken into account this year, including which cities had the least amount of shade due to lack of tree coverage."

So there you have it. Oklahoma City has elite status when it comes to how hot our summers are. Eat your heart, out Tulsa. Which is just 90 minutes away, and somehow didn't make the list. 

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A boy removes his cap to cool his head beneath one of the water misters at the Oklahoma City Zoo on Wednesday, July 20, 2016.  Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

A boy removes his cap to cool his head beneath one of the water misters at the Oklahoma City Zoo on Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-1a0a21360d6c7b3e47f7c4768ce0301a.jpg" alt="Photo - A boy removes his cap to cool his head beneath one of the water misters at the Oklahoma City Zoo on Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman" title="A boy removes his cap to cool his head beneath one of the water misters at the Oklahoma City Zoo on Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>A boy removes his cap to cool his head beneath one of the water misters at the Oklahoma City Zoo on Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Matt Patterson

Matt Patterson has been with The Oklahoman since 2006. Prior to joining the news staff in 2010, Patterson worked in The Oklahoman's sports department for five years. He previously worked at The Lawton Constitution and The Edmond Sun.... Read more ›

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