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Morning Bell: Teen summer jobs decline

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Sara Gibson, 15, helps hands an ice cream cone to Lyla Root, 7, inside a Braum's Ice Cream & Dairy Store in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 25, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman
Sara Gibson, 15, helps hands an ice cream cone to Lyla Root, 7, inside a Braum's Ice Cream & Dairy Store in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 25, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

Good Tuesday morning. It's the last day of summer break for students and teachers in Oklahoma City Public Schools. For some students the past few months have been spent at summer camps and on family vacation. For others, it's a time to make some money at a summer job. 

However, the share of American teenagers working in the summer fell to 35 percent in 2017, down from roughly 50 percent in 2000, according to a recent report by the Pew Research Center.

Looking at data that goes as far back as 1940, researchers at Pew found summer employment among 16- to 19-year-olds generally fluctuated between 46 percent and 58 percent, rising during healthy economies and falling when the economy turns sour.

But according to Pew, the teen summer employment pattern shifted after the 1990-91 recession, and stayed around 50 percent for the rest of the decade. The numbers fell after the 2001 recession, and again during the Great Recession from December 2007 to June 2009. The Oklahoman's Josh Dulaney recently took a look at teenage summer job trends and what motivates some local teens in getting a summer job. 

Back-to-school tax-free weekend

Oklahoma's sales tax-free weekend is Aug. 3 through 5, a time when certain clothes and shoes are exempt from sales tax. Shoppers are allowed items up to $100.

Teacher pay raises

Yesterday it was reported in The Oklahoman that OKCPS teachers would not see their state Legislature-approved pay raises until September. But what about other districts? 

Teachers in the several other Oklahoma City metro-area districts, including Edmond, Midwest City-Del City, Moore and Yukon, will see the state raises on their first checks. They are issued later than Oklahoma City, which operates on a continuous calendar and starts earlier than most districts.

Moore district teachers will see the state pay raises reflected in their first paychecks, which will be issued Aug. 22, eight days after they report and six days after school starts, Superintendent Robert Romines said.

Edmond's 1,430 certified employees and 1,128 support employees, meanwhile, will see pay raises in their first checks in September, according to spokeswoman Susan Parks-Schlepp.

Teachers in the Midwest City-Del City district also get their first paychecks in September.

"Teachers seem pleased," Superintendent Rick Cobb said. "I don't know if I'd describe them as excited, but most that I've talked to acknowledge that this is a significant step towards restoring the profession."

Elli Billingsley.
Elli Billingsley.

First Claudia Griffith PTA scholarship awarded

Elli Billingsley, a recent graduate of Norman North High School, has received the first-ever Claudia Griffith PTA Scholarship from the Norman PTA Council.

The PTA Council has renamed its scholarship program to honor the late Claudia Griffith for her legacy of leadership and volunteerism in Norman’s PTAs. Before becoming a state representative and executive director of Health for Friends, a healthcare non-profit, Griffith served as PTA president at Jefferson Elementary, Longfellow Middle School and Norman North High School. You can learn more about the scholarship and Billingsley here.

Cornett talks low standards for education

Like many candidates, Republican gubernatorial candidate Mick Cornett has been talking about the need for higher standards in education, and he sometimes says that the problems are cultural.

"We just have lower and lower standards in our communities. ... I think we've accepted low standards for ourselves in health and education," Cornett said. 

The Oklahoman's Chris Casteel had a recent story about Cornett's thoughts on education. 

That does it for today's Morning Bell. See you tomorrow.

Related Photos
Sara Gibson, 15, helps hands an ice cream cone to Lyla Root, 7, inside a Braum's Ice Cream & Dairy Store in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 25, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

Sara Gibson, 15, helps hands an ice cream cone to Lyla Root, 7, inside a Braum's Ice Cream & Dairy Store in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 25, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

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Ben Felder

Ben Felder is an investigative reporter for The Oklahoman. A native of Kansas City, Ben has lived in Oklahoma City since 2010 and covered politics, education and local government for the Oklahoma Gazette before joining The Oklahoman in 2016.... Read more ›

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