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Morning Bell: The DACA roller coaster continues

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Amanda Sandoval, with Dream Action Oklahoma, bows her head for a prayer during a vigil to mark the one year anniversary of DACA rescission hosted by Dream Action Oklahoma at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman
Amanda Sandoval, with Dream Action Oklahoma, bows her head for a prayer during a vigil to mark the one year anniversary of DACA rescission hosted by Dream Action Oklahoma at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

Good Tuesday morning! This month marks one year since the Trump administration announced it was ending the DACA program. The program, created by the Obama administration in 2012, allowed qualifying undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children to apply for renewable, two-year permits that would protect them from deportation and allow them to work. The program does not provide a path to citizenship.

“Somebody else is dictating what happens in my daily life by pushing legislation that affects my status, by pulling from legislation that will help my status,” Cynthia Garcia told The Oklahoman. “It's a constant toggle back and forth on whether I should make plans (for) the future or where I should make emergency packages in case I'm at risk of deportation.”

DACA has major implications for students as it provides access to work and other documentation that can be vital in attending college. 

The Oklahoman's Darla Slipke took a look at how DACA recipients and other undocumented Oklahomans were handing the continued roller coaster of their status. 

Last month, I wrote that local schools have seen an increase in stress among students who are undocumented, or may have a parent who is undocumented. 

“A lot of kids are coming to schools with a large amount of trauma and anxiety because they are worried they aren't going to see their parents again,” said Rebecca Kaye, chief of staff for Oklahoma City Public Schools, speaking to the fears some students have that their parents may be deported.

The presidency of Donald Trump and his administration's hard-lined policies on immigration have increased concerns among some of the district's Hispanic students, which account for more than half the district's enrollment, Kaye said.

Education issue

Last Sunday's New York Times Magazine was devoted to education with several stories on the teaching profession in today's America. I'm going to make this my recommended reading of the week. The magazine also had a photo spread on teachers who work multiple jobs, which included some Oklahoma educators. 


State Fair art contests raises money for schools

The Oklahoma Student Art Exhibition, a juried art show for students from preschool to high school, will be on display in the galleries of the Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center during this year's Oklahoma state Fair. The exhibition has been a tradition at the fair for more than 40 years.

In 2017, participating schools received about $3,400. This year, the Oklahoma State Fair partnered with Hobby Lobby to give away $6,500 in gift cards and cash to classroom art funds across Oklahoma.

Interim studies on education begin this week

Two hearings with interim studies in the Oklahoma Senate are scheduled for Tuesday and Thursday. The first round of studies will focus on school bullying, education innovation and classification reform for the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association. On Thursday, senators will study virtual charter school performance, and then look into creating a formalized appeals process for students when considering alternative forms of discipline.

School districts return with lawsuits

School districts that won their lawsuit against the Oklahoma Tax Commission over the distribution of motor vehicle tax collections the last three years say they are headed back to court, reports the Tulsa World.

In contention is nearly $23 million in overpayments to 146 school districts statewide and a corresponding amount in underpayments to 271 other school districts — plus a correction of the error in future payments.

“Following an executive session concerning this litigation yesterday the Oklahoma Tax Commission took no action thus signaling their refusal to correct the now documented $22,797,480.81 error made in motor vehicle revenue apportionments to school districts between August 2016 and August 2017,” said the plaintiffs’ attorney and retired Sand Springs Public Schools chief financial officer Gary Watts. “Due to the commission’s refusal to correct the error, the plaintiffs on Monday, Sept. 10, will file a motion with the District Court of Oklahoma County to order the correction going forward.”

That does it for today's Morning Bell. See you tomorrow!








Related Photos
Amanda Sandoval, with Dream Action Oklahoma, bows her head for a prayer during a vigil to mark the one year anniversary of DACA rescission hosted by Dream Action Oklahoma at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

Amanda Sandoval, with Dream Action Oklahoma, bows her head for a prayer during a vigil to mark the one year anniversary of DACA rescission hosted by Dream Action Oklahoma at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-e4c4d13cc06642707279c30507790d6b.jpg" alt="Photo - Amanda Sandoval, with Dream Action Oklahoma, bows her head for a prayer during a vigil to mark the one year anniversary of DACA rescission hosted by Dream Action Oklahoma at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman" title="Amanda Sandoval, with Dream Action Oklahoma, bows her head for a prayer during a vigil to mark the one year anniversary of DACA rescission hosted by Dream Action Oklahoma at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Amanda Sandoval, with Dream Action Oklahoma, bows her head for a prayer during a vigil to mark the one year anniversary of DACA rescission hosted by Dream Action Oklahoma at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Ben Felder

Ben Felder is an investigative reporter for The Oklahoman. A native of Kansas City, Ben has lived in Oklahoma City since 2010 and covered politics, education and local government for the Oklahoma Gazette before joining The Oklahoman in 2016.... Read more ›

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