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The Morning Brew: And you think you had a bad day at work

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City employees stung by bees

A city worker swats at bees that can be seen flying around the head of a co-worker during bee attack. Worker at right is wearing protective helmet with netting loaned to him by Forest Chapman, a beekeeper and community outreach coordinator with the Oklahoma State Beekeepers Association. Without warning, thousands of bees began swarming and stinging city crews Wednesday morning, Sep. 19, 2018, while they were picking up brush and trees in a residential area south of the downtown area. Just before 11 a.m., debris removal crews working near SE 23 and Walnut Avenue used a grappling arm to pick up a large, hollowed-out tree and set it in the back of a dump truck. One of the workers was stung about 15 times and the other man just a couple as they both raced to the safety of the cab of their city truck, said Capt. David Macy, spokesman for the Oklahoma City Fire Department. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman
A city worker swats at bees that can be seen flying around the head of a co-worker during bee attack. Worker at right is wearing protective helmet with netting loaned to him by Forest Chapman, a beekeeper and community outreach coordinator with the Oklahoma State Beekeepers Association. Without warning, thousands of bees began swarming and stinging city crews Wednesday morning, Sep. 19, 2018, while they were picking up brush and trees in a residential area south of the downtown area. Just before 11 a.m., debris removal crews working near SE 23 and Walnut Avenue used a grappling arm to pick up a large, hollowed-out tree and set it in the back of a dump truck. One of the workers was stung about 15 times and the other man just a couple as they both raced to the safety of the cab of their city truck, said Capt. David Macy, spokesman for the Oklahoma City Fire Department. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

So you think you had a bad day at work? Two City of OKC workers will probably not forget their Wednesday anytime soon. While clearing debris the pair found themselves in the cross hairs of a swarm of angry bees

Oklahoma City workers were caught off guard Wednesday morning as thousands of bees began swarming them while they were picking up brush and trees.

Just before 11 a.m., debris removal crews were working near SE 23 and Walnut Avenue when they used a grappling arm to pick up a large, hollowed-out tree and set it in the back of a dump truck.

One of the workers was stung about 15 times and the other just a couple as they both ran to the safety of the truck’s cab, said Capt. David Macy, spokesman for the Oklahoma City Fire Department.

Fortunately they came away without any serious injuries, which is more than the poor folks in the 1978 film "The Swarm" could say. 

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A city worker swats at bees that can be seen flying around the head of a co-worker during bee attack. Worker at right is wearing protective helmet with netting loaned to him by Forest Chapman, a beekeeper and community outreach coordinator with the Oklahoma State Beekeepers Association.  Without warning, thousands of bees began swarming and stinging city crews Wednesday morning, Sep. 19, 2018, while they were picking up brush and trees in a residential area south of the downtown area. Just before 11 a.m., debris removal crews working near SE 23 and Walnut Avenue used a grappling arm to pick up a large, hollowed-out tree and set it in the back of a dump truck. One of the workers was stung about 15 times and the other man just a couple as they both raced to the safety of the cab of their city truck, said Capt. David Macy, spokesman for the Oklahoma City Fire Department.  Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

A city worker swats at bees that can be seen flying around the head of a co-worker during bee attack. Worker at right is wearing protective helmet with netting loaned to him by Forest Chapman, a beekeeper and community outreach coordinator with the Oklahoma State Beekeepers Association. Without...

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-0916b5110ca827977dd0ca854227c914.jpg" alt="Photo - A city worker swats at bees that can be seen flying around the head of a co-worker during bee attack. Worker at right is wearing protective helmet with netting loaned to him by Forest Chapman, a beekeeper and community outreach coordinator with the Oklahoma State Beekeepers Association. Without warning, thousands of bees began swarming and stinging city crews Wednesday morning, Sep. 19, 2018, while they were picking up brush and trees in a residential area south of the downtown area. Just before 11 a.m., debris removal crews working near SE 23 and Walnut Avenue used a grappling arm to pick up a large, hollowed-out tree and set it in the back of a dump truck. One of the workers was stung about 15 times and the other man just a couple as they both raced to the safety of the cab of their city truck, said Capt. David Macy, spokesman for the Oklahoma City Fire Department. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman" title="A city worker swats at bees that can be seen flying around the head of a co-worker during bee attack. Worker at right is wearing protective helmet with netting loaned to him by Forest Chapman, a beekeeper and community outreach coordinator with the Oklahoma State Beekeepers Association. Without warning, thousands of bees began swarming and stinging city crews Wednesday morning, Sep. 19, 2018, while they were picking up brush and trees in a residential area south of the downtown area. Just before 11 a.m., debris removal crews working near SE 23 and Walnut Avenue used a grappling arm to pick up a large, hollowed-out tree and set it in the back of a dump truck. One of the workers was stung about 15 times and the other man just a couple as they both raced to the safety of the cab of their city truck, said Capt. David Macy, spokesman for the Oklahoma City Fire Department. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>A city worker swats at bees that can be seen flying around the head of a co-worker during bee attack. Worker at right is wearing protective helmet with netting loaned to him by Forest Chapman, a beekeeper and community outreach coordinator with the Oklahoma State Beekeepers Association. Without warning, thousands of bees began swarming and stinging city crews Wednesday morning, Sep. 19, 2018, while they were picking up brush and trees in a residential area south of the downtown area. Just before 11 a.m., debris removal crews working near SE 23 and Walnut Avenue used a grappling arm to pick up a large, hollowed-out tree and set it in the back of a dump truck. One of the workers was stung about 15 times and the other man just a couple as they both raced to the safety of the cab of their city truck, said Capt. David Macy, spokesman for the Oklahoma City Fire Department. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Matt Patterson

Matt Patterson has been with The Oklahoman since 2006. Prior to joining the news staff in 2010, Patterson worked in The Oklahoman's sports department for five years. He previously worked at The Lawton Constitution and The Edmond Sun.... Read more ›

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