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The Morning Brew: Oklahoma Uber drivers get a break

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THousands of Oklahoma drivers will get $100

FILE - This March 20, 2018, file photo shows the Uber app on an iPad in Baltimore. Uber has agreed to pay $148 million and take steps to tighten data security, after the ride-hailing company failed for a year to notify drivers that hackers had stolen their personal information. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
FILE - This March 20, 2018, file photo shows the Uber app on an iPad in Baltimore. Uber has agreed to pay $148 million and take steps to tighten data security, after the ride-hailing company failed for a year to notify drivers that hackers had stolen their personal information. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)


Uber reached a large settlement in a data breach case this week, and Oklahoma drivers are getting a little bit of cash in their pocket as a result. 

Thousands of Oklahoma Uber drivers affected by a 2016 data breach will each get $100 as part of a nationwide settlement with the California-based ride-booking company.

The $148 million settlement, announced Wednesday, came after attorneys general from all 50 states and the District of Columbia investigated Uber for failing to report the breach for a year.

Hackers stole data from about 600,000 drivers. More than 4,600 were in Oklahoma.

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Officials began talking about amending medical marijuana before vote

Oklahoma City — On the day Oklahoma voters went to the polls to decide whether to legalize medical marijuana through State Question 788, a behind-the-scenes campaign to prohibit the sale of smokable products already was underway.

The public didn't learn that a ban on selling some forms of marijuana was even a possibility until a coalition of health professional groups and agencies held a news conference on July 9. The next day, the Board of Health voted to ban the sale of smokable forms of marijuana and to require dispensaries to hire pharmacists — also one of the health groups' priorities.

More here

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Related Photos
FILE - This March 20, 2018, file photo shows the Uber app on an iPad in Baltimore. Uber has agreed to pay $148 million and take steps to tighten data security, after the ride-hailing company failed for a year to notify drivers that hackers had stolen their personal information. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

FILE - This March 20, 2018, file photo shows the Uber app on an iPad in Baltimore. Uber has agreed to pay $148 million and take steps to tighten data security, after the ride-hailing company failed for a year to notify drivers that hackers had stolen their personal information. (AP Photo/Patrick...

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-ff654bc2622a2e218ee286c5677917bf.jpg" alt="Photo - FILE - This March 20, 2018, file photo shows the Uber app on an iPad in Baltimore. Uber has agreed to pay $148 million and take steps to tighten data security, after the ride-hailing company failed for a year to notify drivers that hackers had stolen their personal information. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)" title="FILE - This March 20, 2018, file photo shows the Uber app on an iPad in Baltimore. Uber has agreed to pay $148 million and take steps to tighten data security, after the ride-hailing company failed for a year to notify drivers that hackers had stolen their personal information. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)"><figcaption>FILE - This March 20, 2018, file photo shows the Uber app on an iPad in Baltimore. Uber has agreed to pay $148 million and take steps to tighten data security, after the ride-hailing company failed for a year to notify drivers that hackers had stolen their personal information. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)</figcaption></figure>
Matt Patterson

Matt Patterson has been with The Oklahoman since 2006. Prior to joining the news staff in 2010, Patterson worked in The Oklahoman's sports department for five years. He previously worked at The Lawton Constitution and The Edmond Sun.... Read more ›

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