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Morning Bell: Educators seek to better understand childhood trauma

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Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater speaks during the 'It Starts Here' summit hosted by The Oklahoma State Department of Education at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. The summit hosted featured experts in childhood trauma and healing. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman
Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater speaks during the 'It Starts Here' summit hosted by The Oklahoma State Department of Education at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. The summit hosted featured experts in childhood trauma and healing. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman

Good Thursday morning! 

TODAY: I'm in New York for a two-day juvenile justice fellowship seminar at the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at John Jay College (CMCJ). I'll be taking a closer look in the coming months at the relationship between the state's juvenile justice system and local schools. 

Trauma-informed education

One way many educators and juvenile justice officials say the state can decrease the number of youth in state custody is to be more mindful of the trauma and adverse experiences many students deal with. 

On Tuesday, more than 800 administrators, educators, counselors and others, primarily from high-need and high-enrollment school districts, attended an Oklahoma Department of Education summit that focused on childhood trauma and healing.

The summit was designed to help educators gain a better understanding of childhood trauma and develop tools they can use in their schools and communities to mitigate the impact of childhood trauma. Some common forms of childhood trauma are abuse, domestic violence, neglect and poverty.

Security funding boost for Oklahoma

The Department of Justice announced the Oklahoma State Department of Education will receive $398,345 in grant funding to bolster school security, educate and train students and faculty, and support law enforcement officers and first responders who arrive on the scene of a school violence incident, reports KFOR.

Students under investigation for assault

Four Putnam City West High School students are accused of assaulting another student and could face criminal charges, a school district spokesman said Wednesday. Putnam City spokesman Steve Lindley said district administrators and campus police are investigating the assault, and that one employee has been suspended with pay.

Langston Hughes Academy staff members suspended

The head football coach and another employee at Langston Hughes Academy have been suspended for separate incidents involving inappropriate behavior, reports the Tulsa World

Last week, Langston Hughes’ administration was made aware of “staff members allegedly exhibiting inappropriate behavior,” according to a statement sent to parents.

“We have notified proper law enforcement and are cooperating with them to fully investigate the matter,” the statement reads. “The staff members in question are suspended without pay pending the results of the investigation. We can provide no further comment at this time due to privacy laws.”

Norman will review travel policies

Norman Public Schools is reviewing its travel procedures after a district bus rolled over Saturday along a central Texas highway, seriously injuring multiple students and teachers.

Two teachers and a student from Cleveland Elementary School remained hospitalized Tuesday near Temple, Texas. Four other students were released from the hospital on Monday, district spokeswoman Alesha Leemaster said.

"We are reviewing policies to determine if any changes need to be made to out-of-state travel procedures," Leemaster said in an email.

INBOX: OSSBA opposes State Question 800

The Oklahoma State School Boards Association is encouraging Oklahomans to oppose State Question 800 on Nov. 6.

“Simply put, this state question is vague, filled with unknowns and could erode millions of dollars in dedicated funding for public schools,” OSSBA Executive Director Shawn Hime said in a message to education leaders across the state. From Ballotpedia: A "yes" vote supports amending the state constitution to establish a fund for the investment of 5 percent of the state's oil and gas development tax revenue and for the annual transfer of 4 percent of the fund's capital to the general fund.

That does it for today's Morning Bell. Got a question, comment or story idea? Send an email to bfelder@oklahoman.com.

Related Photos
Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater speaks during the 'It Starts Here' summit hosted by The Oklahoma State Department of Education at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. The summit hosted featured experts in childhood trauma and healing. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman

Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater speaks during the 'It Starts Here' summit hosted by The Oklahoma State Department of Education at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. The summit hosted featured experts in childhood trauma and healing. Photo by...

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-c5348f2e607eeed4e17545b1c1031134.jpg" alt="Photo - Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater speaks during the 'It Starts Here' summit hosted by The Oklahoma State Department of Education at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. The summit hosted featured experts in childhood trauma and healing. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman" title="Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater speaks during the 'It Starts Here' summit hosted by The Oklahoma State Department of Education at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. The summit hosted featured experts in childhood trauma and healing. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman"><figcaption>Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater speaks during the 'It Starts Here' summit hosted by The Oklahoma State Department of Education at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. The summit hosted featured experts in childhood trauma and healing. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman</figcaption></figure>
Ben Felder

Ben Felder is an investigative reporter for The Oklahoman. A native of Kansas City, Ben has lived in Oklahoma City since 2010 and covered politics, education and local government for the Oklahoma Gazette before joining The Oklahoman in 2016.... Read more ›

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