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Oklahoma man arrested in murder-for-hire plot

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FBI investigators have arrested an Alva businessman in a murder-for-hire plot to kill two people, according to a complaint filed Thursday in Oklahoma City federal court.

Vernon Wayne Brock, 69, has been arrested on a complaint of using interstate commerce facilities in the commission of murder-for-hire. Investigators said Brock asked his business partner to kill or find someone to kill his former employee and her boyfriend.

The two men are partners in a vape store chain with several locations in Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri. Brock was reportedly upset with an employee who had left the vape company, according to the federal complaint.

Brock offered $5,000 for hit men to attack the woman and her boyfriend in her Oklahoma City home, investigators said. His business partner, who lives in Kansas, contacted the FBI office in Wichita on March 29 to report the plot.

Federal agents said Brock’s business partner is a member of an outlaw motorcycle gang, and the informant assumed Brock believed he could find someone to kill the two targets. The defendant instructed his partner to pretend the attack was over drug money, according to the complaint.

“What they want to say to (the boyfriend) is, ‘You (expletive), you didn’t pay us for our drugs,’” Brock reportedly said in a recorded phone conversation. “Then pop, before he has anything to say either way.”

Investigators observed Brock met with his business partner on Wednesday at a cafe in Kansas. During the meeting, Brock gave the informant a $5,000 check. FBI agents arrested Brock 7 miles north of Alva as he drove back from the meeting.

In multiple recorded phone conversations with his business partner, Brock had gone back and forth on whether to have the woman killed, but he was clear that her boyfriend was “not surviving the storm,” investigators reported.

In some conversations, he suggested having the woman beaten and the man shot, according to the complaint.

“I’d rather do him, thump her and I mean thump her hard,” he said in a phone call Monday, according to the complaint. “Tell her if she says one word to the cops about anything there will be someone (coming) back to get her and her kids.”

The woman told FBI agents in an interview Tuesday that Brock often coerced her for sexual favors while she worked for him. He employed her on and off over six years to manage cattle, sell mineral rights and, most recently, work at his vape shop, according to the complaint.

She said she had sexual contact with Brock several times, always under the threat of being fired or not being paid, investigators said. She reported she didn’t believe Brock hoped for an exclusive relationship with her, but he wanted to have sexual contact with her “whenever he wanted.”

In her interview, the woman reported Brock was upset with her and constantly sent her angry text messages, investigators said. Both she and Brock’s business partner recalled that he watched her from a parked vehicle outside her home in Oklahoma City, according to the complaint.

A 2012 stalking charge against Brock contains a similar report.

A woman told the Woods County Sheriff’s Office that the defendant sent her an intimidating text message, sat in his vehicle outside her workplace and parked in front of her home in Alva, according to a court affidavit. She had resigned recently from her position at Brock’s business, Raven Oil and Gas.

The charge was later dismissed, but the complainant and another woman maintained protection orders against Brock for a year and a half.

Federal court records show Brock was sentenced to 18 months in prison in 1996 for three convictions of mail fraud.

He made an initial appearance Thursday before a federal judge in Oklahoma City. If found guilty of murder-for-hire, he could face 10 years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release, according to a news release from the U.S. Attorney's Office.

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