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Individuals and groups continued reacting to President Trump's executive orders that should make pipelines easier to build

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A construction site along ONEOK's Arbuckle II pipeline is shown. Executive orders signed by President Trump this week aim to make it easier for projects like this to get built, administration officials have said. [PROVIDED BY ONEOK]
A construction site along ONEOK's Arbuckle II pipeline is shown. Executive orders signed by President Trump this week aim to make it easier for projects like this to get built, administration officials have said. [PROVIDED BY ONEOK]

Reactions continue to executive orders

President Donald Trump's signatures this week on executive orders that aim to make it harder for states to block pipelines and other energy projects due to environmental concerns continued to generate reactions Thursday.

In a statement issued Thursday by Sen. James Lankford, the Oklahoma Republican said he views the orders as necessary tools to reduce regulatory burdens on the nation’s energy industry, adding he hoped they would speed construction of the northern leg of the Keystone XL Pipeline.

“The U.S. should continue to explore as many forms of energy as possible to power our nation, and our energy producers should continue to be able to innovate in the ways they work to safely extract, transport and bring their products to the market,” Lankford said.

The Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association — Oklahoma Oil and Gas Association also applauded the president’s actions.

“Expanding America’s energy infrastructure and clearing unnecessary regulatory hurdles for liquefied natural gas export directly strengthens Oklahoma’s economy,” Chad Warmington, the organization’s president, said Thursday ini a news release. “We are grateful President Trump is taking the action needed to move us closer to achieving energy dominance.”

Meanwhile, a lobbyist with the American Wind Energy Association said Thursday it agrees with the President that it’s critical to improve the nation’s energy infrastructure.

“But these executive orders miss a major opportunity by focusing almost exclusively on pipelines,” said Amy Farrell, a senior vice president with the association who handles its government affairs activities.

Farrell noted the nation’s electrical grid recently was graded poorly by the American Society of Civil Engineers, adding it is “hardly the backbone we need for a 21st Century, high-tech U.S. economy.”

Farrell added that billions of dollars in private investment that are needed to upgrade and expand the nation’s transmission infrastructure continue to be held up by regulatory uncertainty and inefficient processes.

“We are missing a huge opportunity by focusing on only part of the infrastructure solution,” she said.

Staff and Wire Reports

Related Photos
<strong>Power lines in north Edmond are shown. A lobbyist for an organization that represents the nation's wind industry was critical of executive orders signed by President Trump this week because they failed to addressed a significant backlog of upgrades needed to improve the nation's electrical grid. [Oklahoman Archives]</strong>

Power lines in north Edmond are shown. A lobbyist for an organization that represents the nation's wind industry was critical of executive orders signed by President Trump this week because they failed to addressed a significant backlog of upgrades needed to improve the nation's electrical grid....

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-7b6625cb96bd08a85afbb583bd231bb0.jpg" alt="Photo - Power lines in north Edmond are shown. A lobbyist for an organization that represents the nation's wind industry was critical of executive orders signed by President Trump this week because they failed to addressed a significant backlog of upgrades needed to improve the nation's electrical grid. [Oklahoman Archives] " title=" Power lines in north Edmond are shown. A lobbyist for an organization that represents the nation's wind industry was critical of executive orders signed by President Trump this week because they failed to addressed a significant backlog of upgrades needed to improve the nation's electrical grid. [Oklahoman Archives] "><figcaption> Power lines in north Edmond are shown. A lobbyist for an organization that represents the nation's wind industry was critical of executive orders signed by President Trump this week because they failed to addressed a significant backlog of upgrades needed to improve the nation's electrical grid. [Oklahoman Archives] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-1127d3e94ea058c3326bca462f2b7b69.jpg" alt="Photo - A construction site along ONEOK's Arbuckle II pipeline is shown. Executive orders signed by President Trump this week aim to make it easier for projects like this to get built, administration officials have said. [PROVIDED BY ONEOK] " title=" A construction site along ONEOK's Arbuckle II pipeline is shown. Executive orders signed by President Trump this week aim to make it easier for projects like this to get built, administration officials have said. [PROVIDED BY ONEOK] "><figcaption> A construction site along ONEOK's Arbuckle II pipeline is shown. Executive orders signed by President Trump this week aim to make it easier for projects like this to get built, administration officials have said. [PROVIDED BY ONEOK] </figcaption></figure>
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