NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

Super 5 boys basketball: Heritage Hall’s Trey Alexander finding niche in the spotlight

Advertisement
Oklahoma boys Little All-City and Super 5 team member Trey Alexander, of Heritage Hall, poses for a photo at The Oklahoman studio in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Thursday, March 28, 2019. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman
Oklahoma boys Little All-City and Super 5 team member Trey Alexander, of Heritage Hall, poses for a photo at The Oklahoman studio in Oklahoma City, Okla. on Thursday, March 28, 2019. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman

It seems as if everyone is gunning for Trey Alexander.

Gyms are packed when Heritage Hall is on the road. Parents and fans of Oklahoma high school basketball are craving a chance to witness Alexander and his flashy scoring ability. Opposing players and coaches, however, are working on finding ways to stop one of the state’s best underclassmen.

Alexander faces multiple double teams. When the ball isn’t in his hands, he barely has space to move. Teams are focusing on him so much that he is forced to find ways to garner separation and create shots for himself and teammates.

The extra attention doesn’t bug him, though. It’s something he craves.

“I like it a lot,” Alexander said. “I like it because it makes me have to expand my game to find easier ways to score, get the ball to certain people.”

Alexander is a member of The Oklahoman’s Super 5 team. The sophomore standout scored 24 points, grabbed 8.4 rebounds, dished 2.6 assists and nabbed 2.2 steals per outing. His ability to adapt to opposing defenses and grow his game is one of the reasons he is a top prospect in the state.

And his game still has room to grow.

Alexander helped the Chargers to a Class 4A title his freshman season, and their dominance continued this year. Heritage Hall won 46 consecutive games before Kingfisher upended it in the Class 4A title game.

Even as an underclassman, Alexander is a leader. He can score from anywhere. His silky stroke forces defenders to play tight, but get too close, and he will blow past for a layup. His vision is spectacular, as he can dribble around double teams and find open shooters.

But he wants more.

“Being able to know when to be more aggressive and when I can get my teammates involved,” Alexander said. “Being able to play the whole game without any letdown in scoring of efficiency.”

Alexander’s talent has coaches from across the country recruiting him. Oklahoma State coach Mike Boynton was at the Class 4A title game at State Fair Arena to watch. The recruiting process is something Alexander enjoys, but he is also taking his time.

The state title game loss left a sour taste in Alexander’s mouth. He tweeted, ‘We will be back… mark my words.” He knows teams are coming, trying to stop Heritage Hall’s success. It only drives him to be better, to not duplicate the losing feelings.

“We will for sure be working harder,” Alexander said. “(I want to) be able to do the same thing I did last year but be able to hold up the gold ball, so I’ll work 10 times harder if I have to to get back to where I was and be able to have a different outcome than we did this year.”

Cameron Jourdan

Cameron Jourdan joined The Oklahoman in March 2019 to cover high school sports. He graduated from Oklahoma State University in May 2018. He had an internships with The Oklahoman and Stillwater News Press. During his time at OSU, Cameron served in... Read more ›

Comments