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Paseo Farmers Market to start new season Saturday, April 27

Just east of the Fairlawn Cemetery along N Shartel Avenue is a house with a backyard full of vegetables and flowers.

A greenhouse in the yard has tomatoes and watermelons growing in early spring at the home of Paul Mays on NW 28. The produce is growing for the Paseo Farmers Market.

The second season for the Paseo Farmers Market begins at 9 a.m. Saturday.

Mays, 39, works at the SixTwelve, 612 NW 29, a non-profit organization that promotes Paseo community projects involving art, music, education and sustainability. Mays is the director of permaculture, a method of organic farming that reduces waste and rejuvenates the soil.

"I've always wanted to have a farmer's market in the neighborhood and have access to food and not always have to go to a store," he said.

The farmers market will continue each Saturday morning in Paseo until late October, said co-organizer Megan Sisco. She and Jacob Sanders grow vegetables at Mays' home just south of the Breighton Apartments. They will have a booth at the farmers market.

Sisco, 28, said the Paseo Farmers Market has quickly grown in popularity in an area of about 900 homes between NW 23 and NW 30, N Western Avenue and N Walker Avenue.

"It's really exciting to me to see so many people and provide the neighborhood with essential needs," Sisco said. Last year, the crowds grew from 20 to 30 people on Saturdays to more than 150 on some days.

Sanders, 39, grew up on a conventional farm at NW 234 and N Portland Avenue in northern Oklahoma County before he moved to Portland, Oregon, to pursue a career as an artist. In Portland he said he realized farming can be an art, and he has focused on urban farming in smaller spaces.

He moved back to Oklahoma and settled in the Paseo district in 2014. Sanders also has a larger farm on 40 acres in Seminole County where he farms in a wooded area.

In the city, urban farming uses less space by growing many crops on vacant lots and even in containers placed on flat rooftops.

Sanders practices "no-till" farming without pesticides or herbicides. Turning the soil over, by tilling or plowing, is avoided, he said. "You can remove a plant or a weed from a garden, but the idea is to avoid turning the topsoil upside down by tilling."

Too much plowing of the Great Plains in the 1930s led to the Dust Bowl, he said. "We are anti-Dust Bowl farmers."

Sanders said his booth at the Paseo Farmers Market will have salad mixes, foraged mushrooms, tomatoes, melons, onions, kale, chard, mustard and cut flowers.

"It's really important because it creates a space in the community to have access to clean, healthy food," Sanders said.

Local growers can apply for a booth on the Paseo Farmers Market website. They also have a Facebook and Instagram page.

For more information about the Paseo Farmers Market go to https://paseofarmersmarket.com

Related Photos
<strong>Paseo Farmers Market co-organizer Jacob Sanders clears out weeds. He is preparing a booth for the first day of the 2019 season in Paseo on April 27. [CHRIS LANDSBERGER/THE OKLAHOMAN]</strong>

Paseo Farmers Market co-organizer Jacob Sanders clears out weeds. He is preparing a booth for the first day of the 2019 season in Paseo on April 27. [CHRIS LANDSBERGER/THE OKLAHOMAN]

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-336cc3ccda0360b7533e4df779a10e60.jpg" alt="Photo - Paseo Farmers Market co-organizer Jacob Sanders clears out weeds. He is preparing a booth for the first day of the 2019 season in Paseo on April 27. [CHRIS LANDSBERGER/THE OKLAHOMAN] " title=" Paseo Farmers Market co-organizer Jacob Sanders clears out weeds. He is preparing a booth for the first day of the 2019 season in Paseo on April 27. [CHRIS LANDSBERGER/THE OKLAHOMAN] "><figcaption> Paseo Farmers Market co-organizer Jacob Sanders clears out weeds. He is preparing a booth for the first day of the 2019 season in Paseo on April 27. [CHRIS LANDSBERGER/THE OKLAHOMAN] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-f861a6b7b4ff6f5d6e523a8f9fbf4c2f.jpg" alt="Photo - Paseo Farmers Market co-organizer Jacob Sanders works in a backyard garden as he gets ready for the April 27 farmers market season opening day. [CHRIS LANDSBERGER/THE OKLAHOMAN] " title=" Paseo Farmers Market co-organizer Jacob Sanders works in a backyard garden as he gets ready for the April 27 farmers market season opening day. [CHRIS LANDSBERGER/THE OKLAHOMAN] "><figcaption> Paseo Farmers Market co-organizer Jacob Sanders works in a backyard garden as he gets ready for the April 27 farmers market season opening day. [CHRIS LANDSBERGER/THE OKLAHOMAN] </figcaption></figure>
Robert Medley

Robert Medley has been a reporter for The Oklahoman since 1989, covering various news beats in the Oklahoma City metro area and in the Norman news bureau. He has been part of the breaking news team since 2008. A 1987 University of Oklahoma... Read more ›

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