NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

Arcadia Trails offers treatment close to home

Advertisement
Common areas outside the Arcadia Trails residential suites are designed to encourage patients to mingle. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman]
Common areas outside the Arcadia Trails residential suites are designed to encourage patients to mingle. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman]

EDMOND — Arcadia Trails Center for Addiction Recovery opens May 28 to care for the mind, body and spirit of adults battling the chronic disease. The intensive residential treatment center is the first of its kind in Oklahoma.

"Now, people are going out of state for this type of treatment," said Pam Forducey, assistant vice president for Arcadia Trails. "We'll treat Oklahomans first and foremost."

Being treated close to home enhances aftercare and access to family support, said Forducey, a certified rehabilitation psychologist.

The program is designed around a 90-day stay, with one year of follow-up care. Research shows treatment for 90 days results in a higher rate of success. Graduates from the program can return for 12-step meetings, weekly aftercare group sessions and alumni groups that can be vital to their continued recovery.

Arcadia Trails has the feel of a retreat center or resort with 20 semi-private rooms, a chapel, reflection courtyard, fitness center and spaces for communal dining, yoga and art therapy. It is surrounded by woods on the campus of Integris Health Edmond, which can be involved in patient care if necessary.

"Addiction is a chronic disease that needs to be treated on a medical campus," Forducey said. "A brain disease should be treated like any other disease."

A 90-day stay costs $56,000, which is below the national average, she said. The program includes five phases, beginning with evaluation, detox and education about the biology of addiction and ending with planning ways to stay sober after discharge.

Arcadia Trails accepts voluntary admissions only of people 18 or older who have a primary diagnosis of chemical addiction, with or without co-occurring mental illness or trauma.

Dr. Kimberlee Wilson, addiction psychiatrist and medical director, will develop an individualized treatment plan for each patient based on the person's skills, learning style, needs and goals. As brain health improves, patients begin to enjoy life and see themselves "for who they really are and not what the disease made them out to be," Wilson said.

Dream now a reality

Addiction is the No. 1 cause of death in Oklahomans ages 25 to 64. Opening an advanced residential drug and alcohol treatment center in the state was the dream of four people directly touched by the problem.

It started nearly eight years ago with a gathering of Kelly Dyer Fry, now publisher of The Oklahoman; lawyer Reggie Whitten; Terri White, Oklahoma's commissioner of mental health and substance abuse services; and Dr. Murali Krishna, co-founder of the James L. Hall Center for Mind Body and Spirit.

"We were concerned about not having adequate treatment options here," Krishna said,

His mother suffered from mental illness. Fry has a son who has struggled with addiction for years and is doing well today. Whitten lost a son to addiction.

"We wanted to take that enormous pain and convert it into healing," Krishna said.

They traveled around the state and raised nearly $30 million. Integris contributed another $10 million toward construction of the new 60,000-square-foot facility. Fundraising will continue for the patient assistance fund and program support.

"People all across our state rallied together to make Arcadia Trails a reality," said Fry, capital campaign chair.

This month the dream is fulfilled. Arcadia Trails opens for people who are willing to accept treatment that can lead to recovery. It's up to them.

"It's about the courage it will take for people to walk through that door and ask for help," Fry said.

Related Photos
<strong>The Arcadia Trails facility on the campus of Integris Health Edmond opens May 28 for adults seeking treatment for chemical addiction. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman]</strong>

The Arcadia Trails facility on the campus of Integris Health Edmond opens May 28 for adults seeking treatment for chemical addiction. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman]

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-924a353cd20f59a6d32469a2251d08a7.jpg" alt="Photo - The Arcadia Trails facility on the campus of Integris Health Edmond opens May 28 for adults seeking treatment for chemical addiction. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] " title=" The Arcadia Trails facility on the campus of Integris Health Edmond opens May 28 for adults seeking treatment for chemical addiction. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] "><figcaption> The Arcadia Trails facility on the campus of Integris Health Edmond opens May 28 for adults seeking treatment for chemical addiction. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-bef0305d34b7cf7fb7a6269027b935d0.jpg" alt="Photo - The dining area and many of the rooms for residents look out to the woods surrounding the Arcadia Trails addiction treatment center. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] " title=" The dining area and many of the rooms for residents look out to the woods surrounding the Arcadia Trails addiction treatment center. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] "><figcaption> The dining area and many of the rooms for residents look out to the woods surrounding the Arcadia Trails addiction treatment center. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5a1d98ad5e1c3341f0395189cd9df500.jpg" alt="Photo - Kimberlee Wilson, medical director, and Pam Forducey, assistant vice president, pose for a photo after the recent ribbon cutting for Arcadia Trails Center for Addiction Recovery. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] " title=" Kimberlee Wilson, medical director, and Pam Forducey, assistant vice president, pose for a photo after the recent ribbon cutting for Arcadia Trails Center for Addiction Recovery. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] "><figcaption> Kimberlee Wilson, medical director, and Pam Forducey, assistant vice president, pose for a photo after the recent ribbon cutting for Arcadia Trails Center for Addiction Recovery. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-768c16826b21317ede7b74b80c09a4d4.jpg" alt="Photo - Common areas outside the Arcadia Trails residential suites are designed to encourage patients to mingle. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] " title=" Common areas outside the Arcadia Trails residential suites are designed to encourage patients to mingle. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] "><figcaption> Common areas outside the Arcadia Trails residential suites are designed to encourage patients to mingle. [Doug Hoke/The Oklahoman] </figcaption></figure>
K.S. McNutt

Kathryn McNutt covers higher education for The Oklahoman and NewsOK. Since joining the staff in August 2000, she also has worked as the Breaking News editor, Metro editor and assistant Local editor. A native of Oklahoma City, she graduated from... Read more ›

Comments