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Only 4 players in 100 years have won six NFL titles

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New England Patriots' Tom Brady passes the ball while receiving pressure from Los Angeles Rams' Aaron Donald during the first half of this year's Super Bowl on Feb. 3 in Atlanta. [AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File]
New England Patriots' Tom Brady passes the ball while receiving pressure from Los Angeles Rams' Aaron Donald during the first half of this year's Super Bowl on Feb. 3 in Atlanta. [AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File]

Tom Brady will soon slip on his sixth Super Bowl ring, and Herb Adderley is the only other player on the planet who can relate to that level of success in the National Football League, which celebrates its 100th season this year.

"It's going to be a long time, another 100 years, before somebody wins himself six titles," suggested Adderley, the Hall of Fame cornerback for Vince Lombardi's great Green Bay Packers teams of the 1960s.

Adderley, who turns 80 next month, won five championships in Green Bay, including the first two Super Bowls, plus another with Tom Landry's Dallas Cowboys in 1971, as did Hall of Fame lineman Forrest Gregg, who died last month at age 85.

Their Green Bay teammate, offensive lineman Fuzzy Thurston, who died in 2014, won all six of his titles with Lombardi and the Packers just as Brady has won each of his half dozen rings in New England with coach Bill Belichick.

Adderley, who just celebrated his 22-year-old cousin Nasir Adderley's selection in the NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Chargers, won his six rings in a 12-year span.

"There are just so many guys that deserved just one Super Bowl title and then I end up with six, which was half of my career," Adderley said.

Thurston won his six titles over a 10-year span, Gregg over a 15-year career and Brady has won his six rings over a 19-year career. He'll be 42 this summer as he enters his 20th season. Gregg retired at 38, Thurston at 34 and Adderley at 33.

Gregg was the first man to play and coach in the Super Bowl. He took the Cincinnati Bengals to their first Super Bowl during the 1981 season when they lost 26-21 to Joe Montana and the 49ers.

Gregg died last month after a long fight with Parkinson's, a disease his neurologist and family believe might have been triggered by countless concussions he sustained while playing football in the 1950s at SMU and in the NFL from 1956-71 during a Hall of Fame career that led Lombardi to call him "the finest football player I ever coached."

Adderley believes it might take another century for the four-man club to expand to five, but concedes that Brady might very well become the first player to win seven NFL championships.

"Oh yes, indeed," Adderley said. "He has a shot at it as long as he plays."

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