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The Latest: 1st parent guilty plea in college scam imminent

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Fans photograph actress Felicity Huffman, center with back to camera, as she departs federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, where she faced charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photos/Steven Senne)
Fans photograph actress Felicity Huffman, center with back to camera, as she departs federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, where she faced charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photos/Steven Senne)

BOSTON (AP) — The Latest on court appearances for prominent parents, including Hollywood actresses, charged in the sweeping college admissions scam (all times local):

4:20 p.m.

A California entrepreneur has become the first of 33 parents charged in a college admissions scam to agree to plead guilty.

Peter Jan Sartorio's lawyers said in court documents filed Wednesday that the packaged food entrepreneur from Menlo Park will plead guilty.

Sartorio was accused of paying an admissions consultant $15,000 in cash to have someone correct his daughter's answers on a college entrance exam.

The exact charges to which he has agreed to plead guilty were not clear. Sartorio and the other parents were charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud. An email was sent to Sartorio's lawyers seeking comment.

The announcement came just before Sartorio was scheduled to appear alongside other prominent parents in Boston's federal court.

Among those who made their initial appearances Wednesday were actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin (LAWK'-lin), and Loughlin's husband Mossimo Giannulli.

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3:10 p.m.

Actress Felicity Huffman has made her initial appearance in Boston's federal court in a nationwide college admissions cheating scandal.

Huffman did not speak other than to respond to a series of yes or no questions by the judge during the brief hearing Wednesday. She was not asked to enter a plea.

The "Desperate Housewives" star is accused of paying $15,000 disguised as a charitable donation to rig her daughter's SAT score.

She was arrested last month along with fellow actress Lori Loughlin, Loughlin's fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, and other prominent parents and college coaches.

Neither Huffman nor her lawyers have publicly addressed the allegations. She was charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.

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3 p.m.

Actress Lori Loughlin (LAWK'-lin) and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, appeared in court on allegations they paid bribes to get their daughters into the University of Southern California.

Loughlin and Giannulli sat next to each other with their lawyers as the judge asked them if they understood their rights Wednesday in Boston's federal court.

They were not asked to enter a plea.

They are accused of paying $500,000 to have their two daughters labeled as recruits to the USC crew team, even though neither participated in the sport. Neither they nor their attorneys have publicly addressed the charges against them.

They were among 33 parents charged in the college admissions scheme involving coaches at sought-after schools including Georgetown and Yale.

They were charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.

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2:15 p.m.

Actress Lori Loughlin (LAWK'-lin) has arrived at a federal courthouse to face charges in the college admissions cheating scam.

Loughlin arrived at the Boston federal courthouse Wednesday afternoon.

Her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, is also charged in the scheme and arrived at the courthouse before her.

They are accused of paying $500,000 to have their two daughters labeled as recruits to the University of Southern California crew team, even though neither participated in the sport.

They were among 33 parents, including fellow actress Felicity Huffman, charged in what authorities have called the biggest college admissions scam ever prosecuted. Other parents are also expected to appear in court Wednesday.

Huffman, Loughlin and Giannulli have not publicly addressed the allegations against them.

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11:50 a.m.

Actress Felicity Huffman has arrived at a federal courthouse to face allegations she paid a college admissions consultant $15,000 to rig her daughter's SAT score.

The "Desperate Housewives" star walked into Boston's federal court late Wednesday morning, hours before she was set to appear before a judge.

Huffman is among 33 parents charged in what authorities have called the biggest college admissions scam ever prosecuted.

Other parents expected to appear in court Wednesday include fellow actress Lori Loughlin and Loughlin's fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli.

Loughlin and Giannulli are accused of paying $500,000 to have their two daughters labeled as recruits to the University of Southern California crew team, even though neither participated in the sport.

Huffman, Loughlin and Giannulli have not publicly addressed the allegations against them.

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1 a.m.

Actresses Lori Loughlin (LAWK'-lin) and Felicity Huffman are expected in court to face charges that they participated in a wide-ranging college admissions cheating scam.

The actresses and other parents are scheduled make their initial appearances Wednesday in Boston's federal court. Loughlin's fashion designer husband Mossimo Giannulli is also expected to appear.

They were arrested along with dozens of others last month in the investigation authorities are calling Operation Varsity Blues .

Loughlin and Giannulli are accused of paying $500,000 to have their two daughters labeled as recruits to the University of Southern California crew team, even though neither participated in the sport.

Huffman is accused of paying $15,000 that she disguised as a charitable donation to cheat on her daughter's college entrance exam.

Neither Huffman nor Loughlin and Giannulli have publicly commented on the allegations.

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