• Half of Oklahoma counties have no OB/GYNs, delivery hospitals

    Half of Oklahoma counties have no OB/GYNs,...

    By Meg Wingerter Staff Writer mwingerter@oklahoman.com | Updated: Thu, Dec 13, 2018

    The March of Dimes reports 41 of Oklahoma’s 77 counties are what it calls “maternity deserts,” meaning they lack a hospital performing deliveries or an obstetrics provider.

  • Summit focuses on students experiencing trauma

    Summit focuses on students experiencing trauma

    By Darla Slipke Staff Writer dslipke@oklahoman.com | Updated: Tue, Oct 02, 2018

    Hundreds of educators gathered Tuesday in Oklahoma City for a summit focusing on childhood trauma and healing.

  • Gubernatorial candidates push ads on education

    Gubernatorial candidates push ads on education

    By Ben Felder Staff Writer bfelder@oklahoman.com  | Updated: Mon, Oct 01, 2018

    The two leading candidates for governor are airing commercials across the state, each pledging to improve Oklahoma schools and raise teacher pay.

  • OJA contracts with White Fields group home

    OJA contracts with White Fields group home

    By Ben Felder Staff Writer bfelder@oklahoman.com  | Updated: Sun, Sep 30, 2018

    The Oklahoma Office of Juvenile Affairs will partner with a Piedmont facility to offer a “home-like setting” for youth in the juvenile justice system, another effort by the state agency to shift from a focus on detention to treatment.

  • School consolidation pushed by some, but remains tough political sell

    School consolidation pushed by some, but...

    By Ben Felder Staff Writer bfelder@oklahoman.com | Updated: Fri, Sep 28, 2018

    School consolidation pushed by some, but remains tough political sell

  • Oklahoma continues to rank high in rate of women killed by men, study shows

    Oklahoma continues to rank high in rate of...

    By Darla Slipke Dig Team dslipke@oklahoman.com | Updated: Tue, Sep 18, 2018

    After showing improvement last year, Oklahoma's rate of women killed by men took a turn in the wrong direction, according to a report released Tuesday by the Violence Policy Center.

  • Nine more individuals being assisted through Oklahoma's 'commutation campaign' advance to stage two

    Nine more individuals being assisted through...

    By Darla Slipke Dig Team dslipke@oklahoman.com | Updated: Mon, Sep 17, 2018

    Thirty-two individuals who are being assisted through a "commutation campaign" led by Oklahomans for Criminal Justice Reform have advanced to the second stage of review. The Pardon and Parole Board voted to advance 23 individuals last month. The board advanced nine more individuals on Monday.

  • Domestic, sexual violence issues examined at conference

    Domestic, sexual violence issues examined at...

    By Darla Slipke Dig Team dslipke@oklahoman.com | Updated: Sun, Sep 16, 2018

    Hundreds of victim advocates, law enforcement officers, prosecutors, legal aid attorneys, child welfare workers and other counselors, facilitators of batterers intervention programs and others gathered this week in Norman for a two-day conference called the Partners for Change Conference on Domestic and Sexual Violence and Stalking.

  • Three Oklahoma women underwent lobotomies: What happened to them?

    Three Oklahoma women underwent lobotomies: What...

    By Meg Wingerter Staff Writer mwingerter@oklahoman.com | Updated: Wed, Sep 12, 2018

    More than 60 years ago, doctors in Oklahoma City tried out what they thought could be a new standard of care for patients who were nearing death from uncontrolled diarrhea. They drilled holes in their heads and used an ice pick to cut into their brains.

  • Oklahoma climbed to third-heaviest state in 2017

    Oklahoma climbed to third-heaviest state in 2017

    By Meg Wingerter Staff Writer mwingerter@oklahoman.com | Updated: Thu, Sep 13, 2018

    The obesity rate jumped to 36.5 percent, making Oklahoma one of seven states where more than 35 percent of adults have obesity. Only West Virginia and Mississippi had higher obesity rates.

  • One year later, 'Dreamers' still pushing for protection

    One year later, \'Dreamers\' still pushing for...

    By Darla Slipke Dig Team dslipke@oklahoman.com | Updated: Sun, Sep 09, 2018

    One year after the Trump administration announced it was ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, DACA recipients are still stuck in limbo, pushing for protections.

  • As downtown Oklahoma City charter school continues to grow, leaders eye new building

    As downtown Oklahoma City charter school...

    By Ben Felder Dig Team bfelder@oklahoman.com  | Updated: Sun, Sep 09, 2018

    This year’s addition of sixth grade at John Rex charter school is a product of growing enrollment demands and an indication school leaders plan to continue expanding into high school, which would create the need for additional facilities.

  • Oklahoma closer to pinpointing total number of untested rape kits statewide

    Oklahoma closer to pinpointing total number of...

    By Darla Slipke Dig Team dslipke@oklahoman.com | Updated: Fri, Sep 07, 2018

    As Oklahoma slowly moves closer to pinpointing the total number of untested rape kits in the state, some advocates are frustrated by the pace at which things are moving.

  • Effort underway to designate bilingual status on diploma

    Effort underway to designate bilingual status...

    By Ben Felder Staff Writer bfelder@oklahoman.com  | Updated: Tue, Sep 04, 2018

    Thirty-two states include a Seal of Biliteracy on a student’s diploma or transcript, which confirms that the high school graduate is proficient in at least two languages.

  • Oklahoma follows most states in Rx pot, with some unique aspects

    Oklahoma follows most states in Rx pot, with...

    By Ben Felder Dig Team bfelder@oklahoman.com | Updated: Thu, Aug 30, 2018

    Oklahoma is following 29 other states that have already legalized medical marijuana, many of which faced the same types of challenges — both in politics and policy — that Oklahoma is currently working its way through.

  • Connecting with fellow survivors can help those who have lost loved ones to suicide

    Connecting with fellow survivors can help those...

    By Darla Slipke Dig Team dslipke@oklahoman.com | Updated: Thu, Aug 30, 2018

    Connecting with fellow survivors can help those who have lost loved ones to suicide to feel less isolated as they grieve and try to cope with their loss. However, accessing resources specifically targeted toward survivors of suicide loss can be difficult for people who live in more rural parts of the state.

  • State senator awarded Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs contract

    State senator awarded Oklahoma Department of...

    By Ben Felder Dig Team bfelder@oklahoman.com  | Updated: Fri, Aug 24, 2018

    In outsourcing its X-ray services for all seven of its centers, the Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs awarded the contract to a business owned by a current state senator, leading some to question whether it violates the state Constitution, or at least violates the spirit of the law.

  • National school choice group opposing teacher candidates, teacher pay raise supporters

    National school choice group opposing teacher...

    By Ben Felder Dig Team bfelder@oklahoman.com | Updated: Fri, Aug 24, 2018

    A national pro-school choice organization once chaired by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is spending money against Oklahoma teachers running for the state Legislature.

  • Oklahoma Dept of Ed says it didn't ask for review on federal funds to buy guns

    Oklahoma Dept of Ed says it didn\'t ask for...

    By Ben Felder Staff Writer bfelder@oklahoman.com  | Updated: Fri, Aug 24, 2018

    U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos is exploring the idea of letting school districts use federal money to purchase guns, with multiple news outlets reporting that Texas and Oklahoma had asked about using the funds for firearms and firearm training.

  • State approves American Indian cultural charter school

    State approves American Indian cultural charter...

    By Ben Felder Staff Writer bfelder@oklahoman.com | Updated: Thu, Aug 23, 2018

    Organizers of a proposed charter school with a core mission of serving American Indian students won approval from the state Board of Education on Thursday, just months after its application was denied by the Oklahoma City Public Schools board.