• Anna Holloway review: Lyric’s 'Bright Star' shines

    Anna Holloway review: Lyric’s \'Bright Star\' shines

    Anna Holloway | Updated: Mon, Apr 15, 2019

    'Bright Star' runs through April 28 at Lyric in the Plaza.

  • Anna Holloway review: Clark Beckham brought some serious cool to VZD’s

    Anna Holloway | Updated: Fri, Mar 29, 2019

    In addition to his skills as a performer, Clark Beckham has a warm, intimate style that is easy to experience.

  • Nature & You: The first sign of spring has feathers

    Nature & You: The first sign of spring has...

    By Neil Garrison
    NewsOK Contributor |
    Published: Monday, March 18, 2019

    First sign of spring has feathers A change in the seasons is upon us. There comes a time when the daylight hours become exactly equal in length to those of total darkness. It's the advent of the spring season. As for me, however, I choose to rely not on a stopwatch but, instead, place much more faith in observations of one wild songbird in particular: The Harris's sparrow. The treeless expanses that are far north of the U.S.-Canadian border play host to the nests of this feathered sprite. Not surprisingly, that region of the Canadian Arctic is locked in snow and ice during the winter months. Eventually, however, winter comes to an end and the Harris's sparrow quits its central Oklahoma winter stay and heads back

  • Anna Holloway review: 'Girlfriend' at Lyric a date night play

    Anna Holloway review: \'Girlfriend\' at Lyric a...

    Anna Holloway | Updated: Wed, Mar 13, 2019

    For one more weekend, the regional premiere of 'Girlfriend' is playing at Lyric in the Plaza.

  • Awareness campaign celebrates World Down Syndrome Day

    Awareness campaign celebrates World Down...

    Sarah Soell | Updated: Mon, Mar 11, 2019

    The Down Syndrome Association of Central Oklahoma will kick off a 'Knock Your Socks Off' awareness campaign on March 21.

  • Family Talk: Delayed gratification

    Family Talk: Delayed gratification

    By Jim Priest
    For The Oklahoman |
    Published: Monday, March 11, 2019

    When I was in high school, I ran across this quote from English scientist Thomas Huxley: “Perhaps the most valuable result of all education is the ability to make yourself do the thing you have to do, when it ought to be done, whether you like it or not." For some reason, that quote resonated with me, and I wrote it down on the back of an envelope and stuck it in my dictionary. I still have that quote in my files. I’m wondering if it’s a lesson we are learning or teaching today. I see evidence all around me that we’re not. I observe children born to single mothers who are ill prepared to have kids. Poverty is their likely outcome. I see a tsunami of credit card debt, threatening to drown those who bought nonessentials without

  • Nature & You: Before plastic, there was isinglass

    Nature & You: Before plastic, there was...

    By Neil Garrison | Updated: Mon, Mar 11, 2019

    Before plastic, there was isinglass I guess that, at one time long ago, there existed a world without plastics. It is hard for me to imagine, but I suppose that it is so. In those simpler times, people had to rely on natural objects from Ma Nature's inventory. One such item is a geologic oddity called isinglass. Isinglass even merited a notable mention in the song lyrics of the Broadway musical "Oklahoma!" One of the song verses makes reference to the state-of-the-art windows that were sewn into the side panels of the horse-drawn surrey. The windows in that long-gone era were not glass, and they sure as heck were not plastic. Thin sheets of isinglass were both lightweight and transparent; it worked well as a

  • Laugh Lines and Other Wrinkles: Instant recall

    Laugh Lines and Other Wrinkles: Instant recall

    Peggy Gandy | Updated: Wed, Mar 06, 2019

    You can only store so many phone numbers, children’s birthdays and dental appointments.

  • Laugh Lines and Other Wrinkles: For the birds

    Laugh Lines and Other Wrinkles: For the birds

    Peggy Gandy | Updated: Wed, Mar 06, 2019

    A national survey shows that bird watchers spend nearly $41 billion annually on trips and equipment. Their coffee table books picture birds doing all sorts of birdlike things - balancing on telephone wires, picking lice out of their tails, pushing babies out of nests … Dedicated watchers...

  • Family Talk: Life at the speed of ... slow

    Family Talk: Life at the speed of ... slow

    By Jim Priest | Updated: Mon, Mar 04, 2019

    What is the speed of your family life? 55 mph? 95 mph? Is every morning a mad dash out the door and every afternoon and evening filled with activities to which you are rushing? Would you call your family’s pace of life “frenetic, fast and frenzied?” Most of the time, I'm all about going fast and getting things accomplished. But recently I discovered an organization that made me rethink my "go fast" attitude. It's called The World Institute of Slowness in Norway, and they are committed to slowing the world down. Sounds crazy, right? But what they say on the site makes sense. Like these suggestions for slowing down: Don't hurry. If you must, hurry slowly. Rushing always makes you less productive and produces inferior

  • Nature & You: Summer job can be of your own making

    Nature & You: Summer job can be of your own making

    Neil Garrison | Updated: Mon, Feb 25, 2019

    Summer job can be of your own making It's not too late. Now is the opportune time for youngsters to initiate a summer job search. Let me take this opportunity to advocate for my idea of a "make-it-yourself" seasonal employment adventure. First, start with a problem that is in search of a solution. To my way of thinking, that is the precipitous decline of the population of a central Oklahoma songbird called the loggerhead shrike. ("Butcher bird" is another name for this species, owing to its fondness for catching small snakes and tearing them into edible bites.) Second, you'll need some money. A "GoFundMe" plea on the World Wide Web ought to do the trick.

  • Family Talk: Raising resilient kids

    Family Talk: Raising resilient kids

    Jim Priest | Updated: Mon, Feb 25, 2019

    My grandson James just turned 1. He speaks three languages and is mastering quantum physics. Or maybe it just seems that way. But he is a smart kid. Just look at how he bumps into things. James stayed with us recently and enjoyed walking behind a push toy at a crazy fast pace. Granted, James can’t walk just yet, but with the push toy, he could tear down the hallway at breakneck speed. Except when he ran into things. I resisted the urge to help him around the obstacles that impeded his progress. I wanted to see if he persisted in figuring a way around. Eventually he did. Even though he got frustrated and sometimes squawked about it, he persisted. Watching James, I remembered the book "Option B" by Sheryl Sandberg.

  • Nature & You: Frozen soil forces birds out of hiding

    Nature & You: Frozen soil forces birds out of...

    Neil Garrison | Updated: Wed, Feb 20, 2019

    Cold weather makes it possible to see some otherwise-hidden birds.

  • Anna Hollway review: Lots of Fun with ‘Curious George: The Golden Meatball’ at the Plaza

    Anna Holloway | Updated: Mon, Feb 18, 2019

    Lyric’s Theatre for Young Audiences has produced a fun and lively show for young children.

  • Nature & You: The superpower of invisibility

    By Neil Garrison
    NewsOK Contributor |
    Published: Monday, February 18, 2019

    You can have the superpower of invisibility This is no jest. I am as serious as all get out as I lay claim to the fact that I can grant you the superpower of invisibility. Let's get started. Rummage through your clothes closet until you find those outdoor duds that are colored in Earth's pastels. Don these quasi-camouflage items and head out to the garage. Do a thorough search of your tool chest. I'd venture to guess that almost every home has at least one box knife, maybe even a couple. They're nothing more than a handle that is equipped with a razor-sharp blade. Cabbage onto that simple cutting tool because you'll need it for this feat of magic. Now, go to your favorite nature area.

  • Family Talk: Becoming a person of excellence

    Family Talk: Becoming a person of excellence

    Jim Priest | Updated: Mon, Feb 18, 2019

    When I was young and working on a project with my father, I often would become impatient with his attention to detail. Even parts of the project that nobody would see had to be done right. This took too much time for me. Exasperated, I once blurted out, “Dad, why do you do that? No one will ever know!” To which my father calmly replied, “Because I’ll know.” Dad was teaching me to be a person of excellence. To pay attention to detail. To do your work better than expected. In all things, big and small, to perform with excellence. I wish I saw more of that. My wife recently was in the hospital, and although she received good care, they didn’t perform with excellence.

  • Nature & You: Native prairie grass can be a fun garden project

    Nature & You: Native prairie grass can be a fun...

    By Neil Garrison
    NewsOK Contributor |
    Published: Monday, February 11, 2019

    Native prairie grass can be a fun garden project What is the definition of an optimist? One example would be that person who plants a tree while knowing full well it will be the children two generations removed who will enjoy the shade. What is it that you are saying? Your druthers are to not wait that long, you say? That being the case, I'd encourage you to buy a packet of native prairie grass seeds. Garden center stores hereabout most always have Little Bluestem prairie grass seeds available for purchase. My experience has been that it does well as a container plant. Just be sure to afford it a plant pot that is large enough to accommodate the bountiful root system.

  • Family Talk: True love must be sincere

    Family Talk: True love must be sincere

    By Jim Priest | Updated: Mon, Feb 11, 2019

    It’s true we sometimes must act better than we feel, and be kind toward those we don’t like. But expressing affection by mandate is not love.

  • Nature & You: Bird feet an example of Mother Nature's bioengineering feats

    Nature & You: Bird feet an example of Mother...

    By Neil Garrison | Updated: Fri, Feb 01, 2019

    Why is it necessary for us to lay down when we want to fall asleep? Wild birds don't do that. Instead, they seem to balance precariously on tree branches when they choose to close their eyes for the night. Why don't they fall out of the trees?

  • Nature & You: These 'old coots' hang out at the lake

    Nature & You: These \'old coots\' hang out at the...

    By Neil Garrison NewsOK Contributor | Updated: Fri, Jan 25, 2019

    This column is about coots ... those plump, black-colored water birds that have a prominent, white-colored bill.